Lakes and Campgrounds of Eastern Oregon

Welcome to the The Wallowa-Whitman National Forest

Welcome to the Umatilla Nationa Forest

Welcome to Malheur National Forest

Welcome to the Ochoco National Forest & Crooked River National Grassland

Ochoco NF-Maury Mountains Area The Maury Mountains offer solitude and relaxation to those in search of it. There are four campgrounds in the area including one situated on the shore of Antelope Flat Reservoir (a little known fishing hole), and the agate beds near Elkhorn Campground have also been known to attract rock hounds. This beautiful, secluded area is a great place to find your own adventure!

Welcome to Fremont-Winema National Forest

Welcome to Columbia River Gorge National Scenic Area

Welcome to Deschutes National Forest

Welcome to Klamath National Forest

  • Welcome to the Mt. Hood National Forest
  • Welcome to Umpqua National Forest

    Welcome to the Siuslaw National Forest!

    Welcome to the Willamette National Forest

    Obsidian Source Locations for Mapping and GIS

    Thunderegg From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia A thunderegg (or thunder egg) is a nodule-like rock, similar to a filled geode, that is formed within rhyolitic volcanic ash layers.[1] Thundereggs are rough spheres, most about the size of a baseball—though they can range from less than an inch to over a meter across. They usually contain centres of chalcedony which may have been fractured followed by deposition of agate, jasper or opal,[1] either uniquely or in combination. Also frequently encountered are quartz and gypsum crystals, as well as various other mineral growths and inclusions. Thundereggs usually look like ordinary rocks on the outside, but slicing them in half and polishing them may reveal intricate patterns and colours. A characteristic feature of thundereggs is that (like other agates) the individual beds they come from can vary in appearance, though they can maintain a certain specific identity within them.

    Richardson's Rock Ranch in Madras, Oregon, a family-owned and operated rockhounding, digging and rock and lapidary shop, with world-famous agate beds featuring thundereggs and ledge agate material.

    Sunstone From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. A variety known as Oregon sunstone is found in Harney County, Oregon and in eastern Lake County north of Plush. Oregon Sunstone contains elemental copper. Oregon Sunstone is unique in that crystals can be quite large. The copper leads to variant color within some stones, where turning one stone will result in manifold hues: the more copper within the stone, the darker the complexion.[8]

    On August 4, 1987, the Oregon State Legislature designated Oregon Sunstone as its state gemstone by joint resolution.[9]

    The Oregon Sunstone Public Collection Area is a 20-acre parcel of private mining claims (see map). Private mining claims are also located outside and adjacent to the Oregon Sunstone Public Collection Area. Large mechanized mining claim operations are visible near the entrance to the Oregon Sunstone Public Collection Area.

    Fishing

    Popular, Unique and Remote Fishing Opportunities in SE Oregon

    Oregon Fly Fishing for Trout

    Stocking Oregon's high lakes

    June 15, 2018 not all of Oregon’s high lakes support fish populations. To help create fisheries in some of these off-road areas, ODFW stocks hundreds of lakes every two years with brook, rainbow and cutthroat trout. Access the ODFW locations by clicking on the above link.

    Weekly trout stocking schedule

    Each year, ODFW stocks millions of trouts in dozens of reservoirs, lakes and ponds throughout the state. You can use the search and filter functions to search the stocking schedule.

    edule for specific locations and dates. The schedule is subject to change without notice; see individual waterbody listings in the Recreation Report for updates.

    Eastern Oregon Lakes, Campgrounds and Points of Interest

    Oregon State Marine Board Boat Launching Facilities

    Ana Reservoir is one of Oregon's reservoirs that have been stocked with sterile Hybrid Bass; Thompson Reservoir is the other. In addition to hybrid bass Ana Reservoir contains hatchery rainbow trout.

    All sizes of of boats can be launched when the reservoir is full. Bait fishing and trolling both can be productive at this reservoir. People can also do well fly-fishing with leech and minnow imitations.

    The new state record hybrid bass (white and striped bass cross) was caught in Ana Reservoir on Dec. 10, 2014. The fish was caught using a Rapala crankbait on 10 lb. test line and measured 31½ inches with a girth of 24 inches. The fish weighed 19 lbs. 12 oz. Hybrid bass are commonly referred to as, "Wipers".

    Another 16-pound hybrid bass was caught last year and hybrid bass larger than 20-inches are not uncommon. Hybrid bass are targeted successfully using crank baits and fishing bait along the bottom.

    12 tips for catching wipers in Ana Reservoir. Wipers, a cross between striped and white bass, reach prodigious proportions in the productive waters of Ana Reservoir. Their size (up to 19 pounds) and hard-fighting nature make them a popular destination fishery with many anglers.

    ODFW fulfills the expectaton of family members by stocking the reservoir with large numbers of rainbow trout each year. This Summer the reservoir was stocked with 3,000 rainbow trout making Ana Reservoir an excellent destination for the whole family. There have also been a few hybrid bass caught with bait in April. The reservoir is full, which means all sizes of boats can be launched. Bait fishing and trolling both can be productive at this reservoir. People can also do well fly-fishing with leech and minnow imitations.

    Ana Reservoir boat launch is a no use fee boat launch facility managed by Lake County. Contact 541-947-6003 for additional infomation. Directions: Ana Reservoir is located in Summer Lake half way between La Pine and Lakeview on Hwy 31. Use mile point 67 when locatiing Lakeview Ln. Turn east onto Lakeview Ln. Go 1.0 miles and turn right into the entrance road to the boat launch at the end of the road.

    The Ana Reservoir R/V Park is loacted in Summer Lake, Oregon. Halfway between La Pine & Lakeview on Hwy. 31. Watch for the turn off between mile posts 66 & 67. Then turn east 1 mile on Carlon Lane to the park. We are about 100 miles SE of Bend OR. 

    Ana River From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The Ana River contains hatchery rainbow trout. Fishing for rainbow trout is good in the Ana River especially for anglers striving to master fly fishing. Fish will be rising for flies midday as usual. Small beadhead flies will be the most effective, but small dry flies and leech patterns will work.

    Ana River is a great match-the-hatch fly fishing river with good hatches throughout the year. Hatches typically occur during the afternoon from 12-3 p.m. the best time. Small mayfly hatches are typically best on overcast days with light rain. Tui chub and pit roach are abundant in the river therefore casting large flies or lures can be effective for catching larger fish. Lure and bait fishing can also catch plenty of fish. Ana River has good trout fishing 365 days a year.

    Ana River is a great year-round fishery with a rainbow trout limit of 5 fish with an 8-inch minimum length. The Ana River is spring fed at 58F and rainbow trout are active throughout the year. Anglers can access these trout by floating the river in a float tube or by walking the banks. Bait is allowed and fly-fishing can be great.

    Summer Lake Hot Springs is located approximately 24.3 miles south of the Community of Summer Lake. The access road is located on the left side of Hwy 31.

    Antelope Reservoir

    The Oregon Health Authority has issued warnings about very high levels of methylmercury contamination that makes fish caught from the lake dangerous to eat.[6] The contamination stems from past mining activity along the headwaters of Jordan Creek, near Silver City, Idaho, where large quantities of mercury were used to separate gold and silver from other materials.[7]

    The boat launch is a no use fee to launch operated by Lake County. The Antelope Reservoir is managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Contact: 541-473-3144 for additional information.

    Antelope Flat Reservoir (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985). Antelope Flat Reservoir is an irrigation impoundment on the south side of the Maury Mountains in Central Oregon. It is situated near the headwaters of Bear Creek, a tributary of the Crooked River, and was formed by a 33-foot high earthfill dam at the west end of Antelope Flat. Antelope Flat is the name given the dish-shaped valley that supports an exceptional variety of vegetation, from grassy sagebrush on the lower slopes to sparse juniper stands and pine forest at the higher elevations. The reservoir has a storage capacity of nearly 2000 acre-feet and a surface area of 170 acres when full; but it is often drawn down to less than half that size by late summer to satisfy downstream irrigation needs. Rainbow trout are found in the reservoir and there have been reports of a high growth rate and good success by anglers. Recreation facilites have been provided near the dam, including a good paved boat ramp. There is no campground at the reservoir, but a good one nearby.

    DIRECTIONS to Antelope Flat Reservoir and Campground. In Prineville, OR at the intersection of US 26 (Main St) and S. Combs Flat Rd, take S. Combs Flat Rd south 30 miles to Pine Cr/Antelope Res sign. Turn right at sign onto Forest Rt. 17 (gravel) and go 10.3 miles to an intersection. Turn left and immediately bear right at another intersection, staying on Forest Rt 17, and go 3 miles to campground. NOTE: Forest Rt. 17 is single lane with few turnouts.

    GENERAL COMMENTS: The elevation is 5,000 ft. This pack it in/pack it out campground is a single loop in a stand of Ponderosa pine and juniper above Antelope Reservoir. None of the sites have a clear view of the water. While the campground has grass and sagebrush understory, close sites and minimal middlestory provide poor privacy. Most sites tend to be sunny with lots of space for additional tents.

    Antelope Flat Reservoir is a no use fee boat ramp operated by the U.S. Forest Service. Call 541-416-6500 for additional information.

    Balm Creek Reservoir Managed b.y: U.S. Forest Service Contact: 541-523-4476. Balm Creek Reservoir contains rainbow trout, smallmouth bass and crappie. The reservoir site was not completely logged off before the dam was built so there are snags in the shallow areas around the perimeter; these snags contribute organic matter and woody debris to the water. The reservoir is protected from the wind and the water column develops a pronounced thermal stratification in the summer. The water surface is fairly warm and there is some swimming near an unofficial campground at the northeastern end of the reservoir. Oxygen is frequently depleted in the hypolimnion, reflecting the oxidation of organic material in the water. The concentration of phosphorus is moderate and supports occasional blooms of phytoplankton, including blue-green algae. Water transparency is limited (7.9 feet; 2.4 meters) because of the phytoplankton growth. Balm Creek Reservoir is classified at the lower end of eutrophy. (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985).

    Beulah Reservoir on the North Fork of the Malheur River covers a maximum of 1900 acres. Beulah Reservoir is located 16.0 miles from Junatura on a gravel road. . Depart from Hwy 20 onto Hildah St, Juntura, OR to Beulah Reservoir. Trout fishing for Dolly Varden, rainbow, and cutthroat trout are the attraction here as well as big game and waterfowl hunting.  

    Beulah Reservoir Ramp is a no use fee to launch boat ramp operated by Malheur County. Contact 541-473-5191 for additional information. The County maintains a concrete boat ramp, a gravel parking area, and a vault restroom just above the dam. It is located 15 miles north of Juntura, Oregon,

    Big Rock Reservoir a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information.

    Big Swamp Reservoir: electric motors only

    Rule Reference 250-020-0211(1)(e)
    Waterway Big Swamp Reservoir
    Rule Type electric motors only
    Restriction Electric motors only (entire lake)

    Bully Creek Campground

    Bully Creek Reservoir is located ten miles west of Vale, Oregon.  It was constructed by the Bureau of Reclamation in 1963 and is operated by the Vale Oregon Irrigation District.  When full it covers 1000 acres and holds 30,000 acre feet of water.  It supports crappy, largemouth bass, bluegill and yellow perch fish population.

    This park is operated and maintained by Malheur County since 1966, and it consists of 40 campsites all with electrical hookups, two with A.D.A. accessibility, three restrooms with showers, two covered shelters. A day use area with two covered shelters and restrooms. A concrete two-lane boat ramp with a dock, a caretaker who lives on the site. The camp and day use areas have about 14 acres of lawn and trees. The camping fees are $15.00 per sleeping unit per night for all campsites. There is a 10 dollar dumping fee for non overnight guests. Forms of payment accepted At Bully Creek Park are cash or check only.  The park is operated from April 15th through November 15th (weather permitting). Bully Creek Park office is located at 2475 Bully Creek Rd. Vale, Oregon.

    Call (541)473-2969 for reservations.

    Click here to look at Bully Creek Camp area.

    Bully Creek Campsite Map 

    Anglers have found excellent catches of white crappie, yellow perch, black bass, and rainbow trout in the reservoir, although there is a continuous problem with rough fish. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife treated the whole stream system for rough fish before Bully Creek was filled and restocked with game fish; it was treated again in 1973. Migratory waterfowl also use the reservoir with some ducks remaining to nest.

    The Bully Creek boat launch facility a no use fee to launch ramp is managed by: Malheur County. Contact: 541-473-5191 for additional information.

    Bull Prairie Campground has been a gem to the local community and is considered a beautiful woodsy place to enjoy a vacation, host family reunions or social events, and to extensively recreate. This moderate-sized campground is located adjacent to a 28- acre lake, Bull Prairie Lake contains Blue Gill, Brook and is stocked annually with rainbow trout. Non-motorized boating is allowed on this lake. There are family-friendly and wheelchair accessible paved paths along the lake that are designed for people who enjoy morning jogs, bicycle rides, picnicking, and leisure. While this campground offers potable water, ther is no longer any garbage service, so please pack out all garbage and dispose of it at home.

    Day Hiking: Bull Prairie Lake Trail #3056

    Directions: From Heppner, Oregon: Travel south on Highway 207 for approximately 36 miles. Turn east on Forest Service Road 2039 and follow signs to Bull Prairie Recreational Area.

    The campground is located near the Morrow/Grant County OHV Park.  ATV riding is not allowed at Bull Prairie Campground.Directions:

    Accessibility:

    There is a 1.2 mile paved trail that loops around the lake, together with 4 accessible fishing docks.

    Non-motorized boating is allowed on this lake by the U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-676-9187 for additional infomation.

    Burns Pond is a no use fee to launch boat launch ramp for boats with electric trolling motors. The boat launch is operated gy the BLM. at 541 573-4400. Call ODFW at 541-573-6583 for fishing information. Fishing for planted catchable rainbow trout dominates the fishery. Green sun perch, large mouth bass and catfish are occasionally taken. Access is excellent, with plenty of parking, bank trails and an ADA fishing dock. This is a good place to picnic. Directions depart Broadway Hwy - 20 in Burns east on OR-78/ E Monroe St. for 2.3 miles. The entrance to Burns Pond is on the right. Photo from N/F website.

    Campbell Lake Campground above offers camping, a picnic day use area and boat launch for non-motorized boats in a high mountain lake setting located one hour and 20 minutes southwest of Paisley, Oregon. 

    There are 18 campsites with picnic tables and fire rings, three vault toilets, potable water, and garbage service from Memorial Day to Labor Day.

    Campbell Lake, lined with grassy and pebbly shores, is stocked with rainbow trout, making it ideal for fishing, swimming, and boating. There is also a boat ramp for non-motorized or electric motor boats. Additional picnic tables and another vault toilet are located in the day use area.

    Exploring is easy to do from Campbell Lake, as the Lakes Trail System is accessible from the campground. You can hike, ride horses, or mountain bike on interconnected loops of varying lengths between Campbell Lake and Deadhorse Lake.

    Drews Reservoir

    Managed by: Lake County
    Contact: 541-947-6003
    Waterbody: Drews Reservoir
    Use Fee: No

    Campbell Lakeis a no use fee to launch a boat facility. Managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-943-3114 for additional information. Paisley Ranger Station Highway 31 P.O. Box 67 Paisley, OR 97636 Phone 541- 943-3114 TDD 541- 943-3407 Fax 541- 943-4479 Hours: Monday - Friday, 7:45 am - 4:30 pm Closed on National Holidays

    Directions: From Bly, OR take Oregon Highway 140 east toward Lakeview, OR and turn left on Campbell Lake Road. Turn right on Forest Service (FS) Road 34. Continue on FS Road 34 then left on FS Road 28. Then take a left at FS Road 033 and continue to the campground.

    From Paisley, OR head north on Highway 31 toward Silver Lake, OR and turn left on County Highway 2-08, Mill Street, and continue until turning left onto Forest Service (FS) Road 33. Follow FS Road 33 south, then right onto FS Road 28. Continue on FS 28 then left on FS Road 033 to campground.

    Canyon Meadows boat launch is a no use fee boat launch managed by the U.S. Forest Service Contact: 541-575-3000 for addtional information. Upon checking photographs, the boat launch is high and dry depending on water level of the lake.

    Chickahominy reservoir (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985).  Chickahominy Reservoir (also known as Clusters Lake) was created during 1951 and 1952 by the construction of a dam on Chickahominy Creek. It was built with private funds to provide storage of irrigation water for the Silver Creek Ranch. However, as of 1970 the reservoir had never filled to capacity and it proved to be inadequate for its intended purpose. It has since been obtained by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife for sport fishing, and has developed into one of the best fisheries in southeastern Oregon. The reservoir had received its first plant of fish in 1957, a load of Kamloops trout, which prospered in spite of competition for food with an abundant population of rough fish. Despite a series of treatments, the rough fish were not eliminated until the reservoir dried up completely in 1968, and no trash fish have been recorded since that time. In recent years stocking has been primarily fingerling rainbow trout, and fish as large as 32 inches have been caught. The reservoir is open all year and winter ice fishing has been good. In 1981 there were 73,175 visitor days, of which 24,880 were for fishing only. Land ownership around the reservoir is almost totally private, with the exception of about 40 acres near the dam which are administered by the Bureau of Land Management; recreational facilities and a boat launch are provided by the B.L.M. The drainage basin is a semi-arid rangeland covered by sagebrush, with sparse stands of junipers at higher elevations.

    Chickahominy Reservoir has a no use fee to launch facility operated by the BLM. Call 541-573-4400 for additional information.

    Cold Springs Reservoir at South Point boat launch is a no use fee boat launch orerated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service Contact 541-922-3232 for additional information about Cold Springs Reservoir. The boat launch is closed during periods of low water.

    Recreational activities in the area include hunting, bird watching, and fishing. The reservoir was treated in 1967 to eliminate rough fish, at the same time that the Umatilla River was treated. It has since been stocked with largemouth bass, bluegill, and crappie. Crappie fishing in the spring is particularly good. Brown bullheads have also flourished. Boats can be used, but no motors are allowed, and launching is difficult because of the fluctuating water levels and exposed mudflats. There is no overnight camping near the reservoir (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985). Photo from N/F website.

    The Cottonwood Recreation Area, located 45 minutes northwest of Lakeview, Oregon, is one of the busiest campgrounds in the southeast zone of the Fremont-Winema National Forest. Western white pine, white fir offer shade and aspens turn sunny gold every autumn. Abundant deer and even black bear can be sighted strolling through the campground. It’s essential to pack all food away in vehicles or hang it high.

    This campground features 22 campsite, six vault toilets, potable water, and a seasonal camp host. Each campgrounds has a picnic table and campfire ring.

    Additionally, there are four walk-in, tent only sites and one horse camp site. The horse camp includes its own corral and water area as well as a trailer turn-around. This high-elevation camp is generally free of snow mid-June through mid-October.

    Cotton Meadows Lake, stocked with rainbow and Brook trout, offers excellent fishing. There are two day use areas and a boat launch on the lake. Only non-motorized and electric boat motors are allowed. Other recreation opportunities include hiking and exploring.

    Cottonwood Meadow – East is a no use fee to launch a boat facility. Only boat with electric motors allowed. Managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-947-3334 for additional information.

    Cottonwood Reservoir is a no use fee to launch a boat facility. Only boat with electric motors allowed. Managed by Lake County . Contact 541-947-6003 for additional information.

    Directions: Cottonwood Campground is located 45 minutes northwest of Lakeview, OR. From Lakeview, OR travel west on Oregon Highway 140 toward Bly, Oregon. Follow Hwy 140 then turn right on Forest Service (FS) Road 3870. Continue north on FS Road 3870, then follow the signs to the campground.

    Crump Reservoir From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information. Photo from N/F website

    Dead Horse Lake above is located one hour 20 minutes south of Paisley, Oregon situated on Deadhorse Lake, a high-mountain lake with grassy and pebble beaches. The lake, elevation 7372 feet, spans 31 acres and is stocked with rainbow trout. Deadhorse Lake, great for fishing, swimming, and boating (non-motorized or electric motors only), features a boat launch and separate day use area.  All camping is first-come, first-served, and weekends and holidays are generally full.

    Nearby access to the Lakes Trail System. Lakes Loop Trail #140 offers a variety of interconnected loops of various lengths between Campbell and Dead Horse Lakes. Lakes Loop Trail #140 is also connected to Cache Cabin Trail #148 (area is unavailable) providing approximately 27 miles of trails in this area for Forest visitors. Read trail description of for additional information.

    Directions: Deadhorse Lake is located one hour 20 minutes southwest of Paisley, OR. From Paisley, OR follwo Highway 31 north toward Silver Lake, OR and turn left on County Highway 2-08, Mill Street, and continue left on Forest Service (FS) Road 33. At its junction with FS Road 28, turn right. Follow FS Road 28 then take a left on FS Road 033. Continue to campground.   

    Delintment Lake provides a wide variety of recreation facilities and activities for the whole family.  The campground has 29 campsites, a group camping area, a natural non-motorized boat launch, beach area, fishing pier, 12 picnic sites, water, and hosts on site during the summer months.  Hike the trail along the banks or fish from the dam or pier.

    Despite its amenities Delintment Lake Campground received only moderate visitor use during the summer.  The two loop campground offers camping sites near the shore as well as higher on the blank.  The road access is paved up to the campground from Burns, Oregon.  Please pack out what you pack in, no trash service is provided. 

    Directions: From Burns, OR., travel west on US Highway 20 to the junction with the Burns-Izee Road 127.  Continue on the Burns-Izee Road approximately 11 miles to the junction with Forest Road 41.  Follow Forest Road 41 approximately 31 miles to the campground. Swimming in the lake is very popular. Boating - Non-motorized boats such as kayaks and canoes allow visitors to enjoy the lake in the quiet timbered setting.

    Delintment Lake Weather Forecast 

    Dixie Campground: The elevation is 5,200 ft. The campground, pack it in, pack it out, is a series of switchbacks down a hillside on Dixie Summit. Lodgepole pine, along with Douglas and White fir, provide ample shade. Topography and the switchbacks provide excellent privacy. The Sumpter Valley Interpretive Trail, Davis Creek Trail as well as other great recreational activities are just a short drive from the campground. Convenience to US Rt. 26 makes this a good campground for an overnight stop. The nearby Austin House at Austin Junction, offers a cook's night out, gas, limited groceries, and some delicious ice cream cones.

    Directions: From the town of Prairie City, OR., travel 8 miles east on Highway 26, the campground will be on the left. Photo from N/F website

    Dog Lake Campground/Day Use Boat Ramp Area above is located approximately 55 minutes west of Lakeview, Oregon. The campground is a serene destination for those seeking to fish and relax in a lakeside setting. It offers 15 campsites and four vault toilets. Each campsite has a picnic table and campfire ring. 

    Dog Lake Boat Ramp and Day Use Area is across from the campground. Non-motorized boats and boats with electric motors are allowed at Dog Lake. There is a large parking area with adequate trailer turnaround, and one vault toilet. In addition to the boat ramp, you’ll find a fishing dock.

    Dog Lake attracts a multitude of birds including pelicans, geese, ducks, and other waterfowl. Birdwatching and fishing are the main recreational pursuits at Dog Lake. Another bonus is its close proximity to Drews Reservoir and Drews Creek.

    Dog Lake’s water level fluctuates depending on snow melt. It attracts a multitude of birds including pelicans, geese, ducks, and other waterfowl. Birdwatching and fishing are the main recreational pursuits at Dog Lake. Another bonus is its close proximity to Drews Reservoir and Drews Creek.

    Alert: There is no potable water. Visitors need to pack plenty of water.

    Dog Lake is approximately 208 acres at 5100 feet above sea level. Ice fishing is great in Winter!

    Vehicle/Fishing Access: 2 X 4, Boat

    Driving Directions: From Lakeview, take Highway 140 west for 10 miles, then turn left on County Road 1-13. Go on County Road 1-13 for 4 miles and turn right on County Road 1-11D. Go on County Road 1-11D for 4 miles and the road turns into Forest Road 4017. Stay on 4017 for 12 miles, going past Drews Reservoir, and you should see the Dog Lake signs. Fish Species: Largemouth bass, perch, crappie, catfish

    Managed by: Bureau of Land Management
    Contact: 541-947-2177
    Waterbody: Duncan Reservoir

    Fish Lake Campground is a no use fee small dirt boat launch managed by U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-742-7511. Non-Motorized boats and boats powered by small gas motors are allowed and the 10 mph boat speed limit is enforced.

    The Fish Lake Campground is located adjacent to the picturesque Fish Lake in the Wallowa Mountains. As a high elevation campground visitors enjoy fishing, boating, and hiking at the nearby wildernes and non-wilderness trailheads. Six of the 21 tent/trailers sites have been constructed to accommodate persons with disabilities, and 6 sites on the upper loop are available for RV's longer than 20 feet. Considerations: Mosquitos! and dropping water. The Fish Lake Resort offers upscale amenties plus boat rentals to go after rainbow trout, brook trout, tiger trout and Chinook salmon. Brown Mountain Trail #1005, High Lakes Trail #6200. See the North Fork Campground for additional information on hiking trails.

    Directions: In Halfway, Oregon travel north on Main Street to Fish Lake Road; Turn right on Fish Lake road and go 3.3 miles to Clear Creek Road; Turn left on Clear Creek Road and go 4 miles to Forest Road 66; Turn right on Forest Road 66 and go on 12.5 miles to the campground entrance on left side of road. Most of the upper forest road is narrow, single land gravel and dirt road. 

    From Enterprise, Oregon travel south on Oregon State Highway 82 to Joseph for about 6.5 miles; In Joseph turn left on Oregon State 350 and go about 8 miles to the Wallowa Loop Road; Turn right on the Wallowa Loop Road (also known as the Hells Canyon Scenic Byway) and travel on this road which eventually becomes Forest Road 39 for 40.5 miles to Forest Road 66; Turn right on Forest Road 66 and go about 15 miles to the campground entrance on the right.

    North Fork Campground North Fork Campground is a remote and picturesque campground in the midst of old-growth forest, with quiet and secluded campsites available. A boat launch for Fish Lake (10 mph speed limit) is located at Fish Lake Campground, and many amenities are offered at nearby Fish Lake Resort. There are lots of hiking trails within a short distance, including the Fish Lake, High Lakes, Brown Mountain, the famous Pacific Crest National Scenic Trail, as well as the Sky Lakes Wilderness and Mt. McLoughlin Trail systems.

    Additional campgrounds nearby include: Fish Lake Resort,  Fish Lake and Doe Point Campgrounds, Beaver Dam, Daley Creek, Willow Prairie Horse Camp, Whiskey Springs and Fourbit Ford Campgrounds. All are several miles away, and accessed from Forest Road 37.

    Directions: From Butte Falls, Oregon, follow Butte Falls / Fish Lake Highway (County Road 821) to State Highway 140, turn west (right) on Highway 140 and travel 0.25 mile to Forest Road 37 to the south (left).  Continue 1 mile on Forest Road 37 to the campground entrance to the west (right). 

    From Medford, Oregon, or White City, Oregon, travel Highway 62 to Highway 140.  Follow Highway 140 east towards Klamath Falls, Oregon, for 28 miles to Forest Road 37 to the south (right).  Continue 1 mile on Forest Road 37 to the campground entrance to the west (right) 

    From Ashland, Oregon, follow Dead Indian Memorial Highway 22 miles east and turn north (left) on to Forest Road 37. Continue 7 miles to the campground entrance to the west (left).

    Gerber Reservoir From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. The reservoir’s game fish includes white crappie, yellow perch, bluegill, brown bullhead, largemouth bass, rainbow trout, brown trout, and brook trout. The crappie and perch are particularly sought after by anglers. Crappies over 12 inches (30 cm) long are common. The largest crappie ever caught at the reservoir weighed well over 4 pounds (1.8 kg), an Oregon state record. Perch up to 14 inches (36 cm) long are also common at Gerber. Other fish found in the reservoir include tui chub, blue chub, speckled dace, and shortnose sucker.[- North Gerber Campground is a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information - Barnes Valley at Gerber Reservoir a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information.

    Gerber Reservoir

    North Gerber Campground

    Managed by: Bureau of Land Management
    Contact: 541-883-6916
    Waterbody: Gerber Reservoir
    Use Fee: No

    South Gerber Campground

    Managed by: Bureau of Land Management
    Contact: 541-883-6916
    Waterbody: Gerber Reservoir

    Goose Lake (Lake) From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia. Goose Lake is part of a geological trough which runs from Oregon southward past Death Valley, the Walker Lane.

    Goose Lake State Recreation Area includes a campground with various amenities. The park attracts wildlife watchers, campers, and boaters. The campground is open mid-April to mid-October.[6] It is habitat to many flora and fauna including western grebe, long-billed curlew, and a large herd of mule deer which spend much of the time in the 48-site campground.

    Recreational activities on or around the lake include kayaking, canoeing, and hunting, but not fishing. When the lake is full, it has a maximum depth of 24 feet (7.3 m). The lake completely dried up in the years 1851, 1852, 1926, 1929–1934, 1992,[7] 2009, and 2013-2015.

    Goose Lake State Park boat launching facilities a no use fee to launch boat ramp is managed by the Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Contact 800-551-6949 for additional infomation.

    Directons: Depart I-5 S at exit 6, take ramp right toward Mt. Ashland for 0,3 miles. Turn left onto OR-273 / Old Siskiyou Hwy / Old Highway 99 for 6.7 miles. Turn right onto OR-66 / Green Springs Hwy for 58.7 miles. Turn left onto OR-39 / OR-140 for 1.7 miles. Bear right onto OR-140 E / OR-39 N, and then immediately turn right onto OR-140 for 90.6 miles. Bear right onto US-395 / N F St. for 14.7 miles. Turn right onto State Line Ln for 1.1 miles.  Arrive at State Line Ln. The last intersection is Pintail Rd. If you reach Snowgoose Ln, you've gone too far. Goose Lake State Recreation Area. State Line Park Rd, Lakeview, OR 97630.

    Grande Ronde Lake Campground Mnaged by: U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-523-4476

    Grande Ronde Lake Campground is one of three campgrounds in the Anthony Lakes Recreation Area. Located above Grande Ronde Lake in the cool pine-fir tree forest, it offers picturesque views of the lake and meadow. Popular activities include fishing, canoeing, day hiking, and outdoor photography. This campground offers 8 tent/trailer sites, 3 of which are accessible.

    Directions: From Baker City, OR, head north on Highway 30 toward Haines for approximately 10 miles; In Haines turn left and follow the Anthony Lake Highway signs (turns into Forest Road 73) for 25 miles to the Anthony Lake Recreation Area; Go past the Anthony Lake Ski Area for about 1 mile to Forest Road 43; After about 0.5 miles turn left at the campground entrance sign; At the road junction the campground is to the left and the day-use lake parking area is to the right.

    From La Grande, OR, head south on Interstate 84 for 25 mile to exit 285 inNorth Powder, Oregon; In North Powder follow the ski area signs on Highway 237 for 4 miles to Ellis Road; Turn left on Ellis Road and go about 1 mile to the Anthony Lake Highway; Turn right and follow the Anthony Lake Highway (becomes Forest Road 73) for 16 miles to the ski area; past the Anthony Lake Ski Area for about 1 mile to Forest Road 43; After about 0.5 miles turn left at the campground entrance sign; At the road junction the campground is to the left and the day-use lake parking area is to the right.

    The Grande Ronde River float trips.

    Perry Swimming Hole is one of the few deeps spots in the Grande Ronde River to cool off on those hot summer days. Perry Swimming Hole is 2 miles West of La Grande, take exit 257 off I84 West. Very popular during the summer months. The park is for day use only, please be mindful to help keep your area clean and free of glass.

    Hart Lake Landing a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information.

    Haystack Reservoir has developed a popular recreation site. It has been heavily stocked with rainbow trout by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife and provides a fairly successful angling experience; largemouth bass and crappies have also been stocked. Boats can be launched from several points on the shore and fishing from the bank is easy. A Forest Service campground is available for visitors as well as a private resort with boat rentals.

    The elevation is 2,900 ft. The campground is a single bisected loop stretching along the east shore of Haystack Reservoir. Large junipers provide some shade to the campsites and spacing gives most of them good privacy. Every site has some view of the lake as well as Mt. Jefferson and Haystack Butte. Although lake levels do fluctuate, depending on demand for irrigation water, the lake is popular with anglers, boaters, and bird watchers. Loons have been seen on the lake in early spring while osprey, Golden eagles and a pair of owls return each year to raise their families. Many songbirds and waterfowl also regularly visitors the lake. Possible day trips are Gray Butte Valley Cemetery, Rimrock Springs Wildlife Management Area and either of the Ridge Rider Endurance trails (the 10-mile Warner Loop is closest to the campground and open to hikers, horseback riders, and mountain bicyclists). The first weekend after Labor Day, the Columbia Drag Boat Association holds its annual drag boat races.

    Haystack Campground boat lauch facility is a no use fee boat launch managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Call 541-475-9272 for addtional information.

    Haystack West boat lauch facility is a no use fee boat launch managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Call 541-475-9272 for addtional information. A 5 mph limit in the southern cove inside a buoy line extending from south of the boat ramp on the east shore to a point south of the southeast peninsula, as marked.

    DIRECTIONS: From Madras, OR, take US Rt. 97 south 7.7 miles to Haystack Res. sign. Turn left at sign onto Jericho Ln and go 1.3 miles to another Haystack Reservoir sign. Turn right after sign onto Haystack Dr. and go 2.2 miles to campground sign. Turn left at sign and go 0.6 miles to campground. Photo from N/F website

    Heart Lake above is a day-use only lake at 19 acres and 5700 feet above sea level. It is located in a secluded forest niche that allows boats with electric motors only, traveling no more than 5 mph.

    Driving Directions: From Bly, travel 13 miles east on Highway 140, and turn right on Forest Road 3715. Take Forest Road 3715 (paved but narrow) for 7 miles, then turn right on Forest Road 012. Continue on Forest Road 012 for 1 mile and you should see the picnic area entrance. Fish Species: Rainbow Trout

    Higgins Reservoir is a use fee boat launch managed by: Bureau of Land Management. Contact: 541-473-3144 for additional infomation. Electric motors are allowed.

    Directions Higgins Reservoir: Depart Main St./OR-7/Whitney Hwy in Baker City. Travel for 9.1 miles to OR-245. Turn left onto OR-245 / Dooley Mountain Hwy for 29.4 miles. Turn left onto Hereford Loop Rd for 1.6 miles. Follow Hereford Loop Rd when the road turns left. Turn right at the next road and follow for 2.5 miles to the primative boat ramp.

    Holbrook Reservoir is a no use fee to launch a boat facility. Managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-947-3334 for additional information.

    Idlewild Although many think this campground is good only for a brief overnight stay, its tall Ponderosa pine providing ample cooling shade, several hiking and mountain bike trails, and convenience to Burns, OR, are attracting more campers to this little campground. Pull-throughs are good size, thus the reason for the campground's popularity with transient campers, but back-ins tend to be on the short side.

    DIRECTIONS: From Burns, OR, take US Rts. 20 East and 395 North 1.7 miles to an intersection. Turn left, staying on Rt 395 north and go 14.2 miles to campground on right.

    Joaquin Miller Horse Camp: The elevation is 5,200 ft. This horse camp meanders over a Ponderosa pine-covered hillside next to US Rt 395. Many sites have been decommissioned (table and grilles removed) providing very spacious camp sites with good privacy. Corrals and a few hitching rails are provided for equestrian campers and their horses. A unique feature of this campground is the lack of formal designated trails; riders can just go wherever.

    DIRECTIONS: From Burns, OR, take US Rts. 20 East/395 North 1.7 mile to an intersection. Turn left, staying on Rt 395 North, and go 16.3 miles to campground on left.

    Jubilee Lake Campground is a use fee based facility managed by the U.S. Forest Service Contact 541-278-3716 for additional information. Boating at Jubilee Lake is allowed for Non-Motorized Boats. This high elevation, spruce fir surrounded campground is the largest and most popular campground on the Umatilla National Forest. Jubilee Lake is nestled among the trees and the lake provides a beautiful setting for day-use as well as camping. This site is known for good fishing and swimming and is a wonderful way to escape the summer heat. Jubilee Lake campground offers a variety of recreational actitivies for visitors of all abilities, including fishing and hiking trails.

    Day Hiking at Jubilee Lake National Recreation Trail offers a pleasant 2.8 mile stroll around the lake, and, as with most of the facilities at the campground, is fully accessible to wheelchairs.

    Directions: From Weston, Oregon:  Travel 20 miles east of Weston on Highway 204.  Turn left (north) onto Forest Service Road 64. Follow the road for 12 miles and the campground entrance will be on your right.

    From Elgin, Oregon:  Travel 21 miles northwest of Elgin on Highway 204.  Turn right (north) onto Forest Service Road 64. Follow the road for 12 miles and the campground entrance will be on your right.

    Krumbo Reservoir is stocked with rainbow trout to 18 inches, and contains a healthy population of small mouth bass. The Bureau of Land Management at at 541-573-1685 operates a no use fee boat launch.

    Directions depart Broadway Hwy - 20 in Burns east on OR-78 / E Monroe St. for 1.8 miles. Turn right onto OR-205 / Diamond Loop Back Country Byway for 47.1 miles. Turn left onto Hammond Ranch Rd for O.6 miles. Keep left onto Krumbo Reservoir Rd. for 3.6 miles. Arrive at Krumbo Reservoir Rd on the left.

    Lucky Reservoir a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information. Photo from N/F website.

    Lofton Reservoir Campground above is one of the three main points of interest in the Lofton Recreation Area. Located 45 minutes east of Bly, Oregon, this highly developed campground features 26 campsites.  24 of the campsites are RV sites. The road is paved all the way to Lofton Area Reservoir, ideal if you’re towing a trailer or boat.

    A camp host is on site throughout the summer months and provides visitor information. These spacious campsites accommodate trailers and feature grills, fire rings, picnic tables, and tent pads. There are four vault toilets, five group sites, and one ADA designated site.

    This high elevation forest setting showcases a mixed conifer stand. The refreshing lakeside environment attracts migratory birds and deer. Although the water level varies in the reservoir, it is stocked annually. There is a boat ramp and dock that is ADA accessible managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-947-3334 for additional information.

    Besides fishing and relaxing, you can hike 1.5 miles to Heart Lake on a defined trail. This hike is uphill on the way back to Lofton, making it a moderate 3 mile round-trip trek. Some campers bring their pole, food, and make it a day outing of fishing, picnicking, and hiking. There is no potable water. Visitors need to pack an adequate supply of water.

    Directions: Lofton Reservoir Campground is located one hour 35 minutes east of Bly. From Bly, OR follow Oregon Highway 140 east toward Lakeview, Oregon. Turn right onto Forest Road (FS) 3715 then right on FS Road 013 to campground.

    Magone Lake Recreation Area (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985)  Magone Lake is a small natural lake in the Malheur National Forest of east-central Oregon. It lies at an elevation of 5000 feet above sea level in a small, forested drainage basin. The lake basin consists of a single elongate trough oriented north-south. A single intermittent stream, Lake Creek, enters from the north and the outflow is tributary to the East Fork of Beech Creek, which it joins about two miles downstream. The lake was named for Major John W. Magone, a nineteenth century resident of Canyon City who stocked the lake with fish. It is one of the few natural lakes in this part of the state and draws a large number of visitors each year. Most of them come for the fishing; lots of rainbow trout and brook trout are taken, and there reportedly are a few kokanee. The lake is open all year, and winter fishing through the ice is popular. A good Forest Service campground is located on the shore and boats can be launched easily. However, there is no fishing from motorboats, and a 10 mph speed limit on the water is enforced. If hiking is your preference the Magone Lake Trail #352 should fill the bill.

    DIRECTIONS: From Prairie City, OR, take US Rt. 26 west 3 miles to "Magone Lake" sign. Turn right at sign onto Keeney Fork Rd (County Rt. 18) and go 12.3 miles to another Magone Lake sign. Turn left after sign onto Forest Rt. 3620 and go 1.3 miles to a Y intersection. Bear right onto Forest Rt. 3618 and go 0.9 miles to campground on left.

    GENERAL COMMENTS: The elevation is 5,000 ft. This pack it in, pack it out campground, adjacent to the scenic Magone Lake (ma-goon), has two unnamed overlapping loops. A pleasant mix of conifers, including Engelmann spruce and Ponderosa pine, provide ample shade. Magone Lake was formed by a landslide in the 1800s and the story tells of a Major Magone stocking the Lake by carrying two buckets of brook trout to this scenic spot in the late 1800s. Today it is popular with anglars and wildlife. Deer are frequent visitors to the campground while ducks, beaver, muskrat, osprey, and Blue heron are often seen at the Lake. Possible daytrips: Sheep Rock Unit of the John Day Fossil Beds National Monument and its visitor center and the Thomas Condon Paleontology Center.

    The Magone Lake boat launch is a no fee boat launch facility and is managed by: U.S. Forest Service. Contact: 541-575-3000 for additional information.

    The Wild And Scenic Malheur Rivers

    Malheur Reservoir From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia About 80 percent of the 12.3-mile (19.8 km) shoreline is privately owned,[1] Malheur Reservoir is on Willow Creek in Harney County. It covers 500 acres and is located 18 miles east of inside and 15 miles northwest of Brogan, Oregon. Access is on gravel road from both directions. The Malheur Reservoir boat launch facility a no use fee to launch a boat. The boat ramp facility is managed by: Malheur County Contact: 541-473-5191 for additional information.

    Malheur National Wildlife Refuge. Currently public access to the lakes associated with the Malheur Wildlife Refuge are closed.

    Malheur Lake is one of the lakes in the Malheur National Wildlife Refuge in Harney County. Do not confuse Malheur Lake with Malheur Reservoir. Malheur Lake is used for reserch and is closed to public access.

    Malheur National Wildlife Refuge HQ Area Opens in Time for Harney County Bird Festival

    Harney County Migratory Bird Festival

    Cow Hollow Park is situated in rural Malheur County, Oregon near the city of Nyssa. The address of the Park is 1030 Janeta Avenue, Nyssa. The Park is 20 acres and includes twenty- one (21) RV sites with electricity, playground equipment, cement restroom facility with bathrooms and showers, tennis court with basketball hoop, baseball/softball fields and a horseshoe pit. For more information, Click Here. Call to make camping reservations at Cow Hollow:  541 372 2008.

    Mann Lake (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985)  Mann Lake, named for a local rancher, is a shallow playa lake located in the northern portion of the Alvord Valley. This part of the valley is fairly narrow; therefore the alluvial material carried from the enclosing escarpments has formed barriers for a number of small playa lakes. Mann Lake is the largest of these, while Tudor Lake and Juniper Lake to the north are other examples. All are relicts of a larger lake that covered the area during the Pleistocene Epoch when precipitation was greater and evaporation less. Mann Lake is fed by small, intermittent streams that emanate from the east slope of Steens Mountain. There is also intermittent inflow on the east side of the lake, but the drainage basin boundary cannot be identified. Being a lake basin of interior drainage, water is lost by evaporation. The surrounding landscape is a semi-arid rangeland for the most part, although the valley floor south of the lake and most of the shoreline consists of marsh area. While the valley floor is mostly private land, the slopes to the east and west are under administration of the Bureau of Land Management. The lake contains a population of Lahontan cutthroat trout and is managed by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife as a source for the eggs of these fish.

    Mann Lake Campground Directions From Bums, take State Highway 78 southeast for approximately 72 miles. Tum right onto the East Steens Road and travel southwest for approximately 23 miles until you reach the Mann Lake Recreation Site tum-off on your right.

    West Mann Lake Access is a no use fee boat ramp managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Contact 541-573-4400 for additional information.

    East Mann Lake Access is a no use fee boat ramp managed by the Bureau of Land Management. Contact 541-573-4400 for additional information.

    McKay Reservoir: (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985) In addition to the primary purpose of irrigation storage, McKay Reservoir provides auxiliary benefits, specifically for flood control, recreation, and fish and wildlife.

    In addition to the primary purpose of irrigation storage, McKay Reservoir provides auxiliary benefits, specifically for flood control, recreation, and fish and wildlife. McKay Dam is operated on an informal basis for flood control and greatly reduces flows that otherwise would be very damaging. Modification of the spillway section was made in 1978-79 to increase the discharge capacity. This will not prevent damaging flows downstream during an extreme flood event, but it will ensure against a catastrophic flood from dam failure. Recreation at the reservoir, particularly for fishermen, is severely limited by the extreme drawdown required by late summer. Losses of gamefish and destruction of their habitat occurs annually both here and in the Cold Springs Reservoir. The problem is more acute in McKay Reservoir because of low streamflows. There is no supplemental inflow as there is to Cold Springs Reservoir from the Umatilla River. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife stocks McKay with rainbow trout every year, but no minimum pool is guaranteed for their survival. Several times the reservoir has been chemically treated to control species of rough fish. Bass, catfish, bluegills, and crappies have also been stocked and they all provide good fishing at times. Boats can be launched, although no fishing from boats is allowed from April 1 to September 30. There are no camping facilities.

    Both the McKay and Cold Springs Reservoir areas are natural wildlife refuges that are heavily used by migrating waterfowl. The McKay Creek National Wildlife Refuge, established in 1927, consists of 515 acres of the water surface and adjacent shoreline. It provides nesting and feeding areas for thousands of Canadian geese, mallards, sandhill cranes, and other birds. About 200 acres of wheat are planted for the waterfowl and upland game birds. The marshland at the upper end of the reservoir where McKay Creek enters is particularly used by the birds. Some 275 acres of the area have been designated as public hunting grounds.

    The McKay Creek North boat launch is a no use fee boat launch operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contact 509-546-8300 for additional information.

    The McKay Creek South boat launch is a no use fee boat launch operated by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service. Contact 509-546-8300 for additional information.

    Directions to Mckay Reservoir from Pendleton turn south on Hwy 395 from I 84 and travel 5.7 miles. Turn left onto the Mckay Reservoir. Follow the road to the North boat launch or to the South boat launch.

    Middle Fork The elevation is 3,900 ft. This pack it in, pack it out campground stretches between County Rt. 20 and the Middle Fork John Day River under a dense canopy of Ponderosa pine, Douglas fir, and Tamarack (Western Larch). Grass and wildflowers form a pleasant understory but provide minimal privacy. The campground is filled with the sounds of wind and flowing river. While not on the designated scenic State Rt. 7, the campground is close enough to be considered for an overnight stop.

    DIRECTIONS: In Austin (a.k.a. Austin Junction), OR , at the intersection of US Rt. 26 and State Rt. 7, take Rt. 7 north 1.1 miles to "Suzanville 19" sign. Turn onto Middlefork Ln (County Route 20) and go 6.4 miles to campground on left.

    Moon Reservoir Recreation Site is a no use fee to launch facility, that is managed by: Bureau of Land Management. Contact: 541-573-4400 for additional information. Directions: The Moon Reservoir is located 12.9 miles from the intersection of US-20 and US 395 at Riley, OR. Proceed 2.2 Miles toward the SRanch Rd. Turn right onto S Ranch Rd an unpaved road for 1.9 miles. Keep straight for 89 feet. Turn right onto the road and proceed 2.6 miles. Turn left onto the road for 105 feet. Keep right onto the road for 5.7 miles. Turn right onto the road O.4 miles Turn left onto the toad for 0.1 and arrive at Moon Reservoir. Fishermen will find a variety of fish including largemouth bass and other species.

    Mud Reservoir a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information.

    Ochoco Reservoir (Crook) The drainage basin for the reservoir consists mainly of forest land within the Ochoco National Forest. The lower portion of the basin is mostly private rangeland, as is most of the shoreline. On the north shore is Ochoco Lake State Park with a resort, marina, camping areas, and picnic grounds. Recreational use is heavy and good rainbow trout fishing has been available in recent years. However, Ochoco Reservoir has a long history of fishery problems. It was treated in 1968 to remove scrapfish, and treated again in 1973. By 1974 the reservoir was back in production after being restocked. It is open all year and fish are caught at any season. Ice fishing is also popular in the winter.

    Ochoco Lake – Crook County Parks and Recreation District Operated by Crook County Parks and Recreation District, Ochoco Lake Campground is open seasonally from April 1 through approximately October 31 each year, depending on weather and the water level of the lake. Located just seven miles east of Prineville on Highway 26 (11700 NE Ochoco Hwy), Ochoco Lake Campground is situated right on the shores of Ochoco Lake.

    Ochoco Reservoir County Park boat launch faciliy a no use fee to launch facility is managed by the Crook County Parks and Recreation District Call 541-447-1209 for additional information.

    Olive Lake: (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985)  Olive Lake, originally a small natural lake in the headwaters of the North Fork of the John Day River, was enlarged early in this century by the construction of a 35-foot high dam on the Lake Creek outlet. The primary reason for increasing storage was to provide water for power generation. A pipeline diverts outflow to the Fremont Powerhouse, an old power plant which was built during the gold mining days in the Blue Mountains. Upper Reservoir, above Olive Lake, was constructed simultaneously with the dam at Olive Lake. Although these reservoirs were built to store water for power plant use, there have since been demands placed on the water for irrigation purposes.

    The drainage basin for Olive Lake is 4.2 square miles of forest land within the Umatilla National Forest. A nice forest campground is at the north end of the lake near the outlet, and boats can be launched. Because of irrigation withdrawals, the water level fluctuates and sometimes restricts recreational use. A variety of fish species are found in the lake; rainbow trout and brook trout make up most of the catch and there are also lots of kokanee, or land-locked salmon. Unfortunately, there has been a minor problem with rough fish in the lake in past years.

    Water in Olive Lake is low in mineral constituents; major ions, alkalinity, and conductivity are well below average for reservoirs in this part of the state. The concentration of phosphorus is low and water transparency is excellent, both suggesting oligotrophic to mesotrophic conditions. However, other characteristics of Olive Lake indicate that it is mesotrophic. There is some evidence of oxygen depletion below the thermocline, and an oxygen surplus within the relatively shallow thermocline. Surplus oxygen in the thermocline, known technically as a "positive heterograph oxygen curve," generally results from active primary production. The concentration of chlorophyl also suggests mesotrophic conditions, as does the excellent growth of kokanee, rainbow trout, and brook trout. Photo from N/F website.

    Paulina Lake above is located within the caldera of Newberry Volcano, about 25 miles south of Bend, Oregon. The Newberry Caldera encircles the basins of Paulina and East lakes and it is nearly 5 miles (8 km) in diameter. This collapsed caldera is the result of more than 500,000 years of volcanic activity. Neither lake receives water from an inlet stream. Both lakes rely on rain, snowmelt, and hot springs for water. Although these lakes are twins and share much in common, they are not at all identical.

    Paulina Lake, the larger twin, is the deepest at 250 feet (76 m). Paulina Creek drains this lake and has chiseled a narrow gorge through the caldera's west wall creating a remarkable twin waterfall. Thermal vents and hot springs along the lake's northeast edge help create a highly productive ecosystem. The lake fed by snowmelt, hot springs, and groundwater flows from East Lake. The outlet stream from the lake is Paulina Creek that flows westward into the Little Deschutes River. The lake covers an area of 1531 acres. The average depth of the lake is 163 feet with a maximum depth of 250 feet.

    Motorized and non-motorized boats are allowed on this body of water. 

    For boat launch information see Paulina Lake Day Use Area,  Little Crater Boating Site  and Paulina Lake Resort.

    Click here for information on Paulina Hot Springs.

    Fishing

    In May of 1993, a 27-pound, 12-ounce brown trout was pulled out of Paulina Lake, setting a new state record. Paulina first grabbed the state brown trout record in 1965 with a 35-pound, 8-ounce behemoth. However, there is an asterisk behind that record, indicating it was not a legal catch. The fish was wallowing in the lake with a broken hook and line hanging from its mouth and was scooped up with a net. Earlier, a fisherman had hooked the fish and tired it out before it broke the line. The state record kokanee, a 4 pound 2 ounce fish captured in 1989, is also from Paulina Lake.

    Fishing techniques in the Newberry Crater revolve around four “fishing seasons”: ice-out, spring, summer, and fall. These "seasons" will affect one's trolling speed, leader length, depth, presentation, and location. Ice-out is the time to pursue big browns by trolling big plugs. Anglers should try different depths and various parts of lake. In the spring, kokanee schools are scattered in 24 to 100 feet of water. Trolling with bait and jigging are the most popular techniques for catching kokanee this time of year. Still fishing, trolling or casting close to the shoreline are the best bets for the early season. Anglers should concentrate their efforts close to the bank and within 35 feet of the surface for the rainbows and browns. Casting lures from shore in early spring and in the fall is an effective method for catching large brown trout and rainbows. Change the speed of the retrieve often, as a stop-and-go technique is very enticing to large fish. Brown Rooster Tails with a gold blade are good for catching browns. Black Rooster Tails, with a silver blade, are good for rainbows.

    What To Expect

    • Vehicle Access: From Bend, 23.5 miles south on Hwy. 97, then 12.9 miles east on Rd. 21
    • Fishing Access: Campgrounds and resort areas.
    • Boating Regulations:  See boating regulations.
    • Fish Species Present: Kokanee, rainbow trout, brown trout, tui chub, and blue chub
    • Physical Characteristics: Size: 1520 acres; Depth: 250' max.; Elevation: 6350'
    • When/How to fish: Get a weekly fishing report from Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
    • Popular Fishing Methods: Trolling, still-fishing, fly fishing
    • Bait/Lure Fishing Method: Salmon eggs, worms, cheese, power bait, spoon, spinners with gold blade, and black spinners with silver blade
    • Fly Fishing Methods: Use of long leaders 9' or more & 4X tippet or 5X which is better
    • Insect Hatch/Flies to Use: Check the East and Paulina Lakes Major Hatch chart below. Muddler minnows, Adams and woolly buggers
    • Camping Information: Little Crater Campground, Paulina Lake Campground, Newberry Campground
    • Resort Information: Paulina Lake Resort

    Source: “Fishing Central Oregon-Third Edition”, 1998. Geoff Hill, Brooke Snavely, and Raven Wing. Sun Publishing, 716 NE 4th Street, Bend, Oregon. http://www.sun-pub.com

    Paulina Lake (Deschutes)

    Reachcode: 17070302000352 | Area: 1370.8 acres | Shoreline: Although East and Paulina Lakes are favorites with fishermen, both were devoid of fish until a Central Oregon sportsman packed in trout late in the nineteenth century. Since then they have been stocked by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. It is estimated now that over 60,000 anglers visit the lakes each year, although they are among the last lakes to open in the spring because of road blockage by heavy snows. Record German brown trout taken from East Lake have enhanced its reputation over Paulina Lake, but the larger lake has been a consistent producer from year to year, with good catches of rainbow trout and occasional eastern brook trout. Several campgrounds are at the lake, maintained by the Deschutes National Forest. There are a number of summer homes on land leased from the Forest Service and a private resort on the west end.

    Paulina Lake Campground is one of the more popular of the Newberry Monument campgrounds, partially because it is the first campground that you come to as you enter the monument.  It is located on the southwest shore of Paulina Lake and offers opportunities for bird watching, bicycling, sightseeing, and access to the Paulina Lakeshore Trail #3955 and a short walk to Paulina Falls Day Use Area. Find a map of this campground here.

    There is a boat launch within this campground. Paulina Lake Campground Managed by: U.S. Forest Service Contact: 541-383-4000. 10 MPH speed limit is enforced for boating on Paulina Lake. Directions: From Bend, OR: Travel 23.5 miles south on Highway 97, then 12.9 miles east on Paulina Lake Road/County Road 21. Paulina Lake Boating and recreation permit information.

    Paulina Lake Lodge

    Little Crater Campground and Day Use Area. This is one of the most popular campgrounds in all the Deschutes Forest. Be sure to arrive early, because this campground tends to fill by Thursday afternoon for most weekends. The two lakes in the Newberry Monument area are two of the most popular places to camp in Oregon. The lakes may be a bit cold for swimming, but are great for fishing and the views across the lakes are spectacular as they are located in the center of a sleeping volcano, and you are camping on the lake edge with towering sides of the cone around you. Volcanic rock is within site all through the Monument area with some great hikes available through the lava and to nearby waterfalls. The 50 Little Crater sites specifically are on a fairly thin ledge right on the lake and all the campground sites are within a minute walk to the water. The sites are ample sized and most are good for both tents or RV and trailers. There is an RV dump station near the entry of Paulina Lake Campground. next to Paulina Lake, 953. There is a boat launch within this campground.

    Directions: From Bend, OR: Travel 23.5 miles south on Highway 97, then 14.5 miles east on Road 21, and 0.5 miles north on Forest Road 2100 570.

    East Lake (Deschutes)

    Reachcode: 17070302000350 | Area: 968.4 acres | Shoreline: 5.2 mi | View on Interactive Map (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985).  East Lake is one of two lakes occupying Newberry Crater, a volcanic caldera nearly five miles in diameter. It is slightly smaller and is about 40 feet higher in elevation than its neighbor to the west, Paulina Lake.

    East Lake Campground Most sites in this campground are either on the lake or no more than a couple minute walk away. There are opportunities for bird watching, bicycling, sightseeing, and canoeing. East Lake is a little shadier than the other lakes and is a perfect way to beat the heat of the summer. There are nearby hikes into the lava rock and close by waterfalls. Find a map of this campground here. There is a boat launch area within this campground.

    Directions: From Bend, OR: Travel 23.5 miles south on Highway 97, then 16.6 miles east on County Road 21.

    Cinder Hill Campground This campground is located along the shore of East Lake with several of the sites close to the shore and the rest within easy walking distance to the beach area. This campground offers excellent screening between sites in this campground and campers can likely find last minute available sites. It is the largest campground in Newberry Caldera and offers bird watching, bicycling, sightseeing, and canoeing.  The Newberry Crater Trail #3958 and other connecting trails are accessible from the campground. Find a map of this campground here.  There are two boat launch areas and a trailhead within this campground.

    Directions: From Bend, OR: Travel 23.5 miles south on Highway 97, then 17.6 miles east on County Road 21, and 0.5 miles north on Forest Road 2100 700.  Cinder Hill is the last campground that you come to on the road past Paulina and East Lakes in the Newberry Caldera.

    Penland Lake Campground Fall asleep to the sound of crickets and frogs chirping and croaking and wake up to Blue Gill or Rainbow Trout rising on the lake at daybreak. This campground is set on the shore of Penland Lake, which also abuts private land and land owned by Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW). Penland is popular on summer weekends and offers access to fishing, boating, and swimming opportunities. There are seven campsites and two vault toilets on the National Forest portion of the campground, with more campsites located on the adjacent ODFW property. There is also a boat ramp, fishing dock, and benches located on the dam. Picnic tables are available for Day Use on the lakefront as well. There is no potable water or garbage service; please pack out all garbage and dispose of it at home.

    Directions: From Heppner, Oregon (1 hour): Head south while following Main street which turns into Oregon Highway-207 South. For 0.7 miles south of Heppner take a left turn onto Heppner Spray Willow Creek Road (Forest Service Road 53 and County Road 678) for 22.4 miles. After passing Cutsforth Park, climbing Coalmine Hill, and passing Coalmine Hill campground, continue on the Western Route (Forest Service Road 53 and County Road 678) for 0.2 miles. Turn right to take Forest Service Road 21 (County Road 603) for 2.8 miles. Then take a left on Forest Service Road 2103 (Penland Lane and County Road 849)for two miles. Take a left turn onto Forest Service Road 2103-030, at 0.3 miles you have arrived.

    From Pendleton, Oregon (1 hour and 54 minutes): Take Southwest Emigrant Avenue to US Highway-395 South for 47.4 miles. At a four-way intersection take a right onto the Western Route Road (Forest Service Road 53, The Blue Mountain Scenic Byway, and County Road 244) for 21.7 miles. Turn left onto Forest Service Road 21 (County Road 603) for 2.8 miles. Then take a left on Forest Service Road 2103 (Penland Lane and County Road 849) for two miles. Take a left turn onto Forest Service Road 2103-030, at 0.3 miles you have arrived.

    Accessibility: Access to the lake may be hindered in the springtime due to muddy roads, specifically Forest Service Road 2103 (County Road 849).

    Boating - Motorized Only electric motors are allowed on this lake.

    Phillips Reservoir: The 144 square-mile drainage basin contributing to Phillips Lake is mostly within the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest and is covered with a coniferous forest. The Forest Service is charged with management of lands surrounding the lake and has established two campgrounds and two boat launching sites. A small campground is located adjacent to the dam and a very large one, Union Creek Campground, is on the north side of the lake. There are also two designated overflow camping areas at the west end of the lake. Facilities are all accessible from the Sumpter Valley Highway (Highway 220) which flanks the north side of the lake. An unpaved road along the south side of the lake is closed to vehicular traffic. Visitor use at Phillips Lake has been quite heavy since its completion. In addition to use by fishermen and campers, there is also swimming and water-skiing during the summer months. Fishing includes coho salmon, smallmouth and largemouth bass, rainbow trout, yellow perch, and black crappie. Fishing is particularly good near the dam, although success has frequently been hindered by the presence of rough fish. Recreational use of the lake has been greater than expected and there are definite signs of overuse by visitors. The indiscriminant use of land outside designated camping areas has caused serious damage including soil loss, soil compaction, vegetation destruction, litter and trash, wildlife harassment, and general unsanitary conditions. Most of the damage has been caused by vehicle use.

    Health Alert for Phillips Lake advising anglers to limit consumption of yellow perch. However it is our recommendation that you and your loved ones avoid consuming fish, crawdads or bull frogs taken from any contaminated Waters of the State. It is our opinion that consuming any aquatic organisms: fish, crawdads, frogs or freshwater mussels and clams exposes you family and friends to the contaminates that bio-accumulate in these aquatic organisms.

    The State of Oregon claims, "Advisories " are designed to help you gain the health benefits of eating fish and shellfish while protecting you and your family from contaminants sometimes found in seafood." We dispute the States claims because the State refuses to test seafood taken from areas where contaminated seafood is harvested.

    Directions to Phillips Reservoir: Depart Main St./OR-7/Whitney Hwy in Baker City. Travel for 16.8 miles to the first of three boat launches on Phillips Reservoir. Take the access road to the Mason Dam Boat Ramp and follow it for 0.3 miles to the improved boat ramp. The Mason Ramp is a no use fee to launch boat ramp operated by the U.S. Forest Service. Call 541-523-4476 for addtional information. Comments: Contractors recently finished work on a $275,000 project to remove a deteriorated asphalt ramp and replace it with a more durable cast-in-place concrete ramp, improving access, safety and convenience for boaters.

    Directions to the Union Creek Campground and boat launch facility. Depart from the intersection of Whitney Hwy OR-7 and Black Mountain Rd. and travel 2.4 miles to Union Creek Campground and Boat Launch Facility. The Union Creek boat launch is fee based to launch facility operated by the U.S. Forest Service. Contact 541-523-4476 for additional information. 44.692246, -118.030398

    Directions from the intersection of Whitney Hwy OR-7 and Black Mountain Rd. and travel 3.3 miles to the Social Security Trailhead on the lake side of the road.

    Directions from the intersection of Whitney Hwy OR-7 and Black Mountain Rd. and travel 4.3 miles to the Mowich Loop Day Use Area on the lake side of the road.

    Directions from the intersection of Whitney Hwy OR-7 and Black Mountain Rd. and travel 5.6 miles to Hudspeth Rd. Turn left onto Hudspeth Rd and travel for 1.2 miles to NF-2226 / Lake Rd. Turn left onto Lake Rd. for 0.6 miles and turn left onto Forest Road 2220 for the Southwest Shore Campground and Boat Launch. Low water at the reservoir often leave the boat launch high and dry.

    Millers Lane Campground in the Wallowa-Whitman National Forest is situated on the south shore of Phillips Lake. The Millers Lane Campground is the smallest of 3 campgrounds near the lake. Set in an open ponderosa pine forest, this warm site is popular for fishing, hiking, boating, and watching wildlife. Due to fluctuating water levels, the lake may be a short hike down from the campground. There are 11 tent/trailer sites and 4 tent-only sites.

    Directions from the intersection of Whitney Hwy OR-7 and Black Mountain Rd. and travel 5.6 miles to Hudspeth Rd. Turn left onto Hudspeth Rd and travel for 1.2 miles toNF-2226 / Lake Rd. Turn left onto Lake Rd. for 1.3 miles and turn left onto Campground Spur Rd. to the Miller Lane Campground.

    Ochoco Divide Campground is a convenient place to camp while traveling across scenic State Highway 26 by bicycle or car. Resting at the top of the Ochoco Divide in a ponderosa pine forest and at an elevation of 4,700 ft., the campground is easy to access yet gives the high altitude forest feel. Nearby recreational activities include birding, hiking, hunting, mountain biking, nature viewing and road biking. Ochoco Divide Group Site is located within Ochoco Divide Campground. View a map of Ochoco Divide Campground.

    Directions: From Prineville, Oregon: Head east on Highway 26 for approximately 30 miles. Ochoco Divide Campground will be on your right, just past Ochoco Divide Sno-Park and just before the summit.  

    Map of Phillips Reservoir

    Mason Dam Picnic Area The Mason Dam Picnic Area is located along the Powder River in a ponderosa pine forest below the Mason Dam. Popular activities for visitors include; group and family picnicking, fishing, and relaxing. Nearby hiking includes: Phillips Lake South Shoreline Trail and Phillips Lake North Shoreline Trail.

    Mason Dam Viewpoint The Mason Dam Viewpoint is set on the east end of Phillips Lake above the dam. Located off the Elkhorn Drive Scenic Byway (also known as Highway 7) the viewpoint is just a short hike down the trail and offers panoramic views of Phillips Lake and the surrounding forest. Directions: From Baker City, Oregon travel south on Highway 7 towards John Day, Oregon for about 17 miles to the Mason Dam Boat Launch road (also shown as Forest Road 200); Turn left off the highway on Forest Road 200 and immediately to your left is the small pullout for the viewpoint trail. The trail to the viewpoint is about 0.1 miles long and is not accessible for people with disabilities.

    Phillips Lake North Shoreline Trail #1608 The Phillips Lake North Shore trail traverses the northern banks of Phillips Reservoir connecting Mason Dam Boat Launch, Union Creek Campground, Social Security Point, Mowich Loop to a western access point near Hudspeth Lane. Throughout the year trail users will encounter outstanding views while traveling through young growth ponderosa pine forests, grasslands, meadows and historic rock dredge piles bordering the reservoir. Numerous coves and inlets provide opportunities for viewing waterfowl, shorebirds and deer. As a year-round facility, visitors can enjoy the trail for hikes, on their mountain bikes or on cross-country skis. This trail is one of several mountain bike, hiking and equestrian trails that is found in the Phillips Lake Trail system.

    South Shore Phillips Lake Trail – The South Shore Phillips Lake Trail is a lakeside trail meandering along the south shoreline of Phillips Lake. The 6.6 mile non-motorized trail is located approximately 17 miles southwest of Baker City and 10 miles from Sumpter in Baker County, Oregon.

    Phillips Lake Southern Bike & XC Ski Trails

    There are several dual purpose summer and winter trails located south of Phillips Lake that offer a variety of recreation opportunities. In the winter these trails are open for cross country (XC) skiers and snowshoers, and during the spring, summer and fall they are used by mountain bikers, hikers and equestrian riders. The trails include: Deer Lick Trail #1636, Coyote Cove #1637, Rimrock Trail #1638, and Jeep Ride Trail #1639.  The main access for these trails is from the Phillips Lake South Shoreline Trail #1610.  The trails travel through open ponderosa pine and fir forests with occasional views of Phillips Lake. 

    The Phillips Lake XC Ski and Snowshoe Area Trail page has maps, difficulty levels and other access information about the trails during the winter, and the Phillips Lake Trails page has maps and access information for the spring- fall months.

    Pilcher Creek Reservoir Managed by: Union County Contact: 541-963-1001. The park offers 17 primitive camping sites, vaulted toilets, dock and boat ramp (5mph speed limit). Pilcher Creek Reservoir is nestled in the foothills of the Elkhorn Mountains with picturesque scenery, a choice destination for camping enthusiasts. The fishing is great and wildlife is abundant. An elk feeding/viewing station is nearby and elk can typically be seen during the winter months.

    Pilcher Creek Reservoir is located off I84 exit 285 North Powder, head West on North Powder River Lane to junction of Tucker Flat Road. Turn right onto Tucker Flat Road, Pilcher Creek Reservoir will be on the right hand side.

    Poison Creek Reservoir (Malheur)

    Poison Spring Reservoir (Malheur)

    Powder River Trailhead The Powder River Trailhead is located in the Powder River Recreation Area below Phillips Lake. This accessible recreation site is divided into an upper and a lower trailhead parking area (see directions below). Visitors have easy access to the outdoors on the Powder River Interpretive Trail #1613 connected by bridges on both sides of the river. Anglers may fish for trout from two platforms or the two bridges along the trail. Hikers and wildlife viewers can experience a closeness to nature while resting on the riverside benches, or learning more about the site from the 2 interpretive sites. Wildflowers are plentiful in June and July. Directions: From Baker City, Oregon travel south on Highway 7 towards John Day, Oregon for about 15 miles; The trailhead for this site is in 2 sections - an upper parking area and a lower parking area.

    The lower parking area is adjacent to Highway 7, and the upper parking area can be reached by going another 1/2 mile up the highway and turning left on Forest Road 1145. Travel 0.3 miles on Forest Road 1145 to the upper parking area. Both parking areas are connected by the trail.

    Rock Creek Reservoir atTaft Miller Access

    Managed by: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife
    Contact: 800-720-6339
    Waterbody: Rock Creek Reservoir
    Use Fee: No

    Rock Springs

    This small campground is convieniently located just off of Forest Road 17.  Nestled among pondersoa pine trees, this secluded campground offers a wonderful place for those in search of a quiet place to stay, whether camping or just needing a quiet place to spend the night while traveling from Burns to John Day, Oregon. 

    The campground has light use until big game hunting seasons.  Visitors can enjoy fishing in Poison Creek Resevoir, hunting and horseback riding local trails such as Malheur River Trail #303 and Craft Cabin trail #319, or hike the Mud Lake A Trail #5008, the Strawberry Basin Trail #375.Located within the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness, this trail gives access to the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness Lakes Basin and Strawberry Mountain, climbing through alpine woodland on a journey to lakes, peaks and waterfalls.

  • The Strawberry Basin Trail, along with Strawberry Campground, is one of our higher use areas. Anticipate other users during summer season and heavy use near holiday weekends. No parking for horse trailers allowed at trailhead. The road is fairly rough for passenger cars.Click here for further details. Strawberry Lake Trail #5004

  • Directions: From Burns, OR., travel east on US Highway 20 approximately 2.8 miles to US Highway 395 north.  Turn right onto US Highway 395 north toward John Day, OR.  Follow US Highway 395 for approximately 30.8 miles to the junction with Forest Road 17.  Turn right onto Forest Road 17, travel 4.8 miles to the junction with Forest Road 054.  Follow Forest Road 054 for approximately 1 mile, the campground will be on the right.

    The Wild And Scenic Malheur Rivers

    Sid Luce Reservoir a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information.

    Skull Hollow Campground

    Situated southeast of Haystack Reservoir, this campground offers views of Gray Butte and easy access to Skull Hollow Trailhead, the Gray Butte Trailhead, the Cole Loop Trail (#854),  and Smith Rock State Park.

    View a map of Skull Hollow Campground.

    View a vicinity map here.

    *** There is a Closure Order prohibiting dispersed camping outside of the Skull Hollow campground. View a map of the closure area here. This closure is designed to help protect natural resources around the trailhead from overuse and to prevent conflict between campers and day users. Please observe the closure order and use the campground for camping in the vicinity of Skull Hollow trailhead.

    Directions: From Madras, Oregon: Travel south on Highway 97. Take Lone Pine Road and proceed east. Turn left onto Skull Hollow Road (Forest Service Road 5710). Skull Hollow campground will be on the left. 

    From Prineville, Oregon: Travel north on Highway 26. Take Lone Pine Road and head south/west. Turn right onto Skull Hollow Road (Forest Service Road 5710). Skull Hollow Campground will be on the left.

    Sprague River From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia is an unincorporated community in Klamath County, Oregon, United States.[1] It is about 45 miles (72 km) northeast of Klamath Falls near the Sprague River, northwest of Oregon Route 140.[2]

    Beatty Access is a no use fee to launch boat ramp managed by rhe Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Contact 800-720-6339 for additional information.

    Directions from Hwy 97 exit 247 S. Turn sharp to the left onto OR-422 E/Chiloquin Hwy (signs for Sprague River) for 1.1 miles. Chiloquin Hwy continues as W Chocktoot St. for 0.3 miles. Turn Left onto N. First Ave. for 0.4 miles where it becomes the Spargue River Rd. for 33.1 miles. Turn left onto OR-140 for 6.8 miles. Turn left onto the boat launch Rd. and you have arrived.The boat launch is primitive at best and only suitable for kayaks, canoes or rubber rafts.

    Malheur Road Take-Out is a private no use fee to launch boat ramp on the Sprague River

    Directions from Hwy 97 exit 247 S. Turn sharp to the left onto OR-422 E/Chiloquin Hwy (signs for Sprague River) for 1.1 miles. Chiloquin Hwy continues as W Chocktoot St. for 0.3 miles. Turn Left onto N. First Ave. for 0.4 miles where it becomes the Spargue River Rd. for 23.1 miles. Turn left onto Drews Rd. for 6.6 miles. Turn right onto Malheur St. the right again at the end of the street. Drive to the end on the block and turn left into the primitive access road to the boat launch. The boat launch is primitive at best and only suitable for kayaks, canoes or rubber rafts.

    Strawberry Campground The campground is located at the edge of the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.  Set amongst ponderosa pine in a beautifully wooded area, the campground is an excellent starting point for anyone wanting to hike, hunt, fish or simply relax.  Strawberry Basin Trailhead is located at the campground.  Strawberry Basin Trail #375 connects to other trails in the wilderness allowing for day hiking or backpacking trips.

    Water from springs, lakes, ponds, and streams should have proper treatment before you drink it. No matter how pure it may look, surface water should be considered unsafe to drink until properly treated. The most common disease associated with surface water is giardiasis, caused by ingesting the microscopic parasite Giardia lamblia. To be safe, boil or treat the water before drinking. The recommended treatment is to bring water to a rolling boil for five minutes.

    If you are patient, lucky, and observant, you may see many kinds of wildlife in the wilderness. The list includes: elk, mule deer, antelope, black bear, cougar, California bighorn sheep, ruffed and blue grouse, pileated woodpecker, sharp-shinned hawk, bald eagle, pine marten, mink, beaver, and many more birds, fur-bearing animals, and other creatures. In fact, 378 kinds of animals and 22 fish species can be found in the area. 

    Starr Campground is located just off of US Highway 395 making it very easy to get to.  The campground has an upper level that is closer to the highway, yet still set back amongst beautiful pondersa pines.  The lower part of the campground is set further back in the pine trees allowing for a more secluded experience.  This beautiful campground sets in a prime spot for hunters, hikers and wildlife enthusiats.  Within a 7 mile drive of the campground are numerous trailheads leading into the beautiful Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.  Just a few more miles down the road is beautiful Logan Valley, this area is amazing during the spring, summer and fall months affording wildflower, wildlife and scenery viewing. 

    Starr Campground is a great base camp spot for those wanting to explore the Murderers Creek area and have the opportunity to see the wildhorses that reside there.

    Directions: From the town of John Day, OR., travel south on US Highway 395 approximately 16 miles.  The campground will be on the right.

    Sugar Creek Campground and Day Use Area: Sugar Creek Campground and Day Use Area are among the most highly developed recreational sites on the Ochoco National Forest.  The campground offers three moderately accessible campsites and all pathways are ADA compliant.  The setting of the facility is a young ponderosa pine forest, straddling a creek with easy access to a paved Forest Service Road. Opportunities for picnicking with a large group exist in the Day Use Area.  Additionally, a short hike and wildlife viewing along Sugar Creek Trail are available throughout the facility. Come take a break from civilization and enjoy the fresh pine scented air at Paulina Ranger District's most desirable campground!

    View a map of Sugar Creek Campground and Day Use Area.

    Directions: From Prineville, Oregon: Take Post-Paulina Hwy (State Highway 380) southeast from Prineville for about  55 miles, then turn left onto Izee Hwy east of Paulina (County Road 112).  Travel on County Road 112 for 3.5 miles to Beaver Creek Road (County Road 113). Turn onto the left fork (County Road 113) and go 7.5 miles to Forest Service Road 58. Follow Forest Service Road 58 for 2.25 miles to Sugar Creek Campground. Sugar Creek Campground is about 12 miles from the community of Paulina and near Rager Ranger Station, which is no longer operational.

    Accessibility: There are 3 partially accessible campsites, and most of the other campsites have some accessible features. The Sugar Creek Trail is paved and has little change in grade. The paths to the bathrooms are also flat and have little to no obstacles.

    Thief Valley Reservoir The Park offers 10 primitive camping sites, vaulted toilets, dock, and boat ramp. Thief Valley Reservoir is located in a unique high desert setting with views of the Wallowa and Elkhorn Mountains and a wind farm on the horizon. The park is popular for its fishing and water sports.

    Windy conditions can make for treacherous boating and outstanding wind surfing. Ice fishing is popular in the winter months and beware of rattlesnakes in the summer!

    Thief Valley Reservoir is located off I84 exit 285 North Powder, head East onto US-30/OR-237. Turn right onto Telocaset Lane, turn left at tracks to stay on Telocaset Lane. Turn slight right onto Thief Valley Road. Photo from N/F website.

    Thompson Reservoir Located 40 minutes south of Silver Lake, Oregon, Thompson Reservoir Campground is a developed campground ideally situated on the three-square-mile reservoir with pretty vistas of nearby Hager Mountain. There are 19 campsites with picnic tables, fire rings.  Other amenities include hand-pumped water, and three vault toilets. There is also one large group site.

    Tall ponderosa pines and a few aspen trees lord over the high mountain setting of Thompson Reservoir. Recreation opportunities include fishing, hiking, and exploring. The reservoir is stocked once a year with rainbow trout and there is a boat launch. 

    This campground typically opens mid-May and closes mid-October. Heavy snowfall prevents this campground from being used in the winter and early spring. 

    Thompson Reservoir campground is located across the reservoir from the East Bay Campground.

    Directions: Thompson Reservoir Campground is located 40 minutes south of Silver Lake, Oregon. From Silver Lake, take Oregon highway 31 west for approximately one mile and then turn left onto County Highway 4-11 (also known as Marsh Road). County Highway 4-11 will become Forest Service (FS) Road 27. From FS Road 27 take a left onto FS Road 2700287. Thompson Reservoir Campground is at the end of the road.

    Tip Top Campground is a small peaceful campground located not far from Delintment Lake Campground.  This 3 site campground has been newly renovated with new restrooms, picnic tables and fire rings.  Except for the last mile, the road access to Tip Top is paved from Burns, Oregon. Please pack out what you pack in, no trash service is provided.

    Directions: From Burns, OR., travel west on US Highway 20 to the junction with the Burns-Izee Road 127 Forest Road 47.  Turn right onto County Road 127/Forest Road 47 at the sign for Yellowjacket Lake and Delintment Lake.  Follow County Road 127/Forest Road 47 approximately 11.8 miles to the junction with Forest Road 41.  Follow Forest Road 41 approximately 27 miles, turn left to stay on Forest Road 41.  Follow Forest Road 41 approximately 5.8 miles to the junction with Forest Road 800.  Turn left onto Forest Road 800.  Follow Forest Road 800 0.5 miles the campground will be on the right.

    Trout Farm Campground offers opportunities for picnicking, pond/stream fishing, and hunting. This nice little campground is ideal for families, or the fishing enthusiast.  This campground offers a nice  pond for fishing with an barrier free path along the pond as well as a barrier free pier.  Trout Farm Campground also has a newly renovated covered picnick shelter and running water.  A great place to visit near the Strawberry Mountain Wilderness.

    Directions: From the town of Prairie City, OR., turn onto South Main Street.  Follow South Main Street to the junction with Bridge Street.  Turn left onto Bridge Street and continue past the local cemetary.  The road then changes to County Road 62.  Later continue on County Road 62 approximately 13 miles, the Trout Farm campground will be on the right. There is plenty of parking at the campground for day use visitors to park and enjoy the pond.

    Unity Lake State Recreation Site is a no use fee boat launch facility managed by: Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Contact: 800-551-6949 for additional information.

    The high desert surroundings of Unity Reservoir offer a unique experience to its guests. The fragrant smell of juniper lingers in the air and thrills the senses. The cool grass of the park is a vibrant contrast to the sagebrush and cheatgrass of the bordering lands. The Burnt River comes to rest behind the Unity Dam before continuing its path down the valley. Relax on the shores or enjoy water sports. There's a boat ramp to accommodate the water skier as well as the angler. A peacefulness will engulf you at Unity Lake State Recreation Area whatever you choose to do.

    Directions Unity Reservoir: Depart Main St./OR-7/Whitney Hwy in Baker City. Travel for 9.1 miles to OR-245. Turn left onto OR-245 / Dooley Mountain Hwy for 34.1 miles. Turn right onto the entrance to Unity Lake State Park for 0.5 miles to the boat launch facility.

    Upper Cow Lake (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985).  Upper Cow Lake is one of two quite large lakes located in the Jordan Craters area of southeast Oregon. They were formed when the Cow Creek Valley was choked by a number of geologically recent lava flows. The flows issued from the Jordan Craters which are aligned in a north-south direction a little to the west of Cow Creek. One result of this mode of origin is that the lakes extend into lateral valleys behind the lava dam; hence they have very irregular shorelines. During high water stages water overflows across the basalt to supply a number of other lakes in the lava terrain to the southwest. Inflow to the lakes is from a number of intermittent streams and from seepage through the volcanic terrain. There is a 17-foot difference in water surface elevation between the two lakes when they are full, but during summer month's water levels drop considerably. Both are very shallow and are connected by a narrow channel called The Narrows.

    Upper Cow Lake is a no use fee boat launch managed by: Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Contact: 800-720-6339 for additional information. Photo from N/F website.

    Vee Lake Access a no use fee to launch a boat is managed by by the Bureau of Land Management Contact 541-947-2177 for addtional information.

    Wallowa Lake (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985). is best known as a recreational area. In addition to the native fish in Wallowa Lake From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia, the lake has been stocked with rainbow trout, mackinaw, and Dolly Varden and offers excellent fishing for all species. A good highway skirts the eastern shoreline and provides access to a large state park at the south end. Those wishing to explore the back country of the Wallowa Mountains, the Eagle Cap Wilderness, must proceed on any one of a number of scenic trails. Recreational use at the lake has increased dramatically in the last two or three decades and so has the number of lakeside residences, from a scattered few in the 1940s to over 300. Shoreline ownership is about 56 percent private land, while the remainder is state park. Wallowa Lake Fishing

    Hiking Trails at Wallowa Lake Oregon

    Directions from the Marion St. Bridge over the Willamette River in Salem to the Wallowa Reservoir. The trip is a lengthy  varying from 8 to 12 hours travel time depending on traffic and direction of choice.   Depart the Marion St Bridge NE, Salem, OR 97301. Depart Water St NE toward Union St NE for the brief distance of 348 feet. The Road name changes to Union St NE. for 351 feet. Turn left onto OR-99E N BR / Front St NE for 0.1 miles. Turn left onto OR-99E BR / Commercial St NE, for 1.4 miles. Turn right onto OR-99E BR / Salem Pkwy NE for 1.6 miles. Road name changes to OR-99E / Salem Pkwy NE for 0.1 miles. Road name changes to OR-99E BR / Salem Pkwy NE. The Salem Pkwy changes its name several times over the next 1.3 miles. Take ramp right for I-5 North toward Portland for the next 40.9. At exit 300, take ramp right for I-84 East / US-30 East toward Portland Airport / The Dalles for 259.6. miles. At exit 261, take ramp right for OR-82 toward Elgin / La Grande for 0.2 miles. Turn right onto OR-82 / Island Ave for 1.6 miles. Turn left to stay on OR-82 / N McAlister Rd for 1.9 miles. Turn right to stay on OR-82 / N River St for 6.3 miles. Keep straight onto OR-351 / N Main St for 0.6 miles, Keep left to stay on OR-351 for 5.3 miles. Arrive at OR-351 Wallowa Lake State Park.

    Directions to Wallowa Lake State Park from I-84 and I-205. Depart I-84 E / US-30 E for 252.0 miles. At exit 261, take ramp right for OR-82 toward Elgin / La Grande for 0.2 miles. Turn right onto OR-82 / Island Ave for 1.6 miles. Turn left to stay on OR-82 / N McAlister Rd for 1.9 miles. Turn right to stay on OR-82 / N River St for 6.3 miles. Keep straight onto OR-351 / N Main St for 0.6 miles, Keep left to stay on OR-351 for 5.3 miles. Arrive at OR-351 Wallowa Lake State Park.

    State Park boat launch is a no use fee to launch managed by Oregon Parks and Recreation Department. Contact 800-551-6949 for additional information.

    North Wallowa Lake Boat Ramp is a no use fee to launch managed by Wallowa County. Contact 541-426-3332 for additional information.

    Walton Lake The reservoir is a contribution to the people of Oregon from the Isaak Walton League of Prineville in honor of their well-known patron. Walton Lake is operated to provide quality public recreation, and the League has been successful in achieving this goal. It attracts anglers in a part of the state where few natural lakes exist. Catches of rainbow trout are good, and the fish are stocked regularly by the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife. Swimming is also a popular recreational activity. Motorboats are prohibited. Two Forest Service campgrounds are maintained at the lake for use by visitors.

    Walton Lake Campground may be the best known location on the Ochoco National Forest due to the serene setting among old growth ponderosa pine and mountain meadows.  Visitors can choose to spend their vacation fishing on the shore of Walton Lake, or swimming and paddling in the water.  There are also many trails nearby for those who would like to explore on foot or bicycle, such as Walton Lake Trail (#809) which circles the lake. Take advantage of the Lake shore trail hike. comments@friendsoftheochocos.org.

    See also Walton Sno-Park.

    Nearby Activities Include: Bird Watching, Boating, Canoeing, Fishing,  Hiking, Hunting, Mountain Biking, Photography, Road Biking, Sightseeing, Swimming

    View a map of Walton Lake Campground.

    Walton Lake is facility is a no use fee boat launch managed by the U.S. Forest Service. Call 541-416-6500 for addtional information. Walton Lake is 18 acres. Power boats limited to electric motors.

    DIRECTIONS: From Prineville, OR take US Rt. 26 east 14 miles to Ochoco R.S. sign. Turn right at sign and go 8.3 miles to Walton Lk sign. Turn left onto Forest Rt. 22 and go 6.4 miles to campground sign. Turn left at sign and go 0.1 miles to campground. GENERAL COMMENTS: The elevation is 5,200 ft. The campground stretches around Walton Lake with sites tucked in among a variety of conifers including Ponderosa pine, Douglas fir, and Western larch (Tamarack). Most of the tent sites are walk-in and located on the Lake's north shore. Although this section's vaults are not wheelchair-friendly, it has ample pressure water spigots. The south shore section has one handpump but its vaults are wheelchair-friendly. The campsites in the south shore section can accommodate tents and RVs. Most sites in the campground have a view of Walton Lake.

    Warm Springs Reservior covers approximately 4200 acres at full pool. The predominant Wildlife in the region is mule deer, various waterfowl and chucker partridge. Largemouth and Smallmouth Bass, blugill, channel catfish and rainbow trout are the main fish species founf in the reservoir. North Warm Springs boat launch areas has valut toilets.

    Warm Springs Landing South is a no use fee boat launch that is not usable during draw down. The Warm Springs Landing South is the functional boat launch at the reservoir. More work needed on launching a boat at Warm Springs Reservoir. The facility is Managed by: Bureau of Land Management. Contact: 541-573-4400 for additional information. Directions: The access road to the Warm Springs Landing South is located 16.8 miles on the Warm Springs Rd. The road is a long and dusty tirip. Reservoir and river level information is available from the US Army Corps of Engineers here.

    Wildcat Campground and Day Use Area *UPDATE August, 2018: The bridge accessing Wildcat Campground and Day Use Area has a 5 ton load limit. This is the only access to this area.*

    This quiet and cool forested campground is one of the more popular fee campgrounds on the Ochoco National Forest because it is relatively close to town, yet provides an escape from the intense desert heat in the summer months. It is located near Mill Creek Wilderness and gives campers opportunities to see old growth dependent species, such as the pileated woodpecker, and hike the Twin Pillars non-motorized trail. Twin Pillars Trailhead is located adjacent to the campground providing access to Mill Creek Wilderness and Twin Pillars Trail (#832). View a map of Wildcat Campground.

    Wildwood Campground This small rustic campground is located east of the 2,035-acre Ochoco Divide Research and Natural Area. It is forested with ponderosa pine, western larch, Douglas-fir, and grand fir. It has easy access from Highway 26, and is seldom crowded so it makes for a quiet and peaceful getaway. Firefighters were able to protect this campground from the 2014 Bailey Butte wildfire.

    Directions: From Prineville, Oregon: Travel east on Highway 26 for approximately 26 miles. Turn right at Mark's Creek Sno-Park and that will put you onto Forest Service Road 2630. Follow FS Road 2630 for approximately 4 miles. At the junction of Forest Service Road 2630 and Forest Service Road 2210, turn left onto Forest Service Road 2210. Continue for approximately 4 miles and Wildwood Campground will be on your right. Keep a sharp eye out because the campground sign is frequently stolen and may not be at the site.

    Willow Creek Lake is a no use fee boat launch managed by Willow Creek Park District. Contact: 541-676-9618 for additional information. The lake is stocked annually with rainbow trout. The lake also contains Small and Largemouth Bass, Black Crappie, Brown Bullhead, and Pumpkinseed Sunfish. Each year the lake on. Turn left, staying on Rt 395 North, and go 16.3 miles to campground on left.

    Willow Valley Reservoir From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985). Willow Valley Reservoir is a relatively large irrigation reservoir just north of the California border in the southeast portion of the Klamath Basin. In spite of its primary purpose of storing water for downstream irrigation, it has become well known locally for its outstanding bass fishing. Largemouth bass taken here are reported to average better than a foot long, some weighing as much as four pounds. The lake also contains Crappie, Largemouth Bass, a good population of bluegill and yellow perch.

    The Willow Valley Reservoir is a no use fee boat launch operated by the Bureau of Land Management. There are no camping facility at the Willow Valley Reservoir. Contact 541-883-6916 for additional infomation.

    Directions to Lake: From Klamath Falls travel on State Route 140 to Dairy, then turn right on County Road 70. Continue south on Langell Valley Road through Lorella. As you near the California border watch for a sign to the reservoir and turn left on Willow Valley Road.

    Wolf Creek: This campground is located in a shaded ponderosa pine forest adjacent to Wolf Creek. Wolf Creek Campground and Wolf Industrial Campground are now being operated as just Wolf Creek Campground, and fees apply to all areas. The campground roads are narrow with tight corners and RV's over 20' are not recommended. View a map of Wolf Creek Campground.

    Directions: From Prineville, Oregon: Take Post-Paulina Highway (State Hwy 380) southeast of Prineville for about 55 miles then turn left onto Izee Hwy (County Road 112). Travel on County Road 112 for 3.5 miles to Beaver Creek Road (County Road 113). Turn left onto Beaver Creek Road (County Road 113) and travel approximately 6 miles to Forest Service Road 42. Follow Forest Service Road 42 for 2 miles to the campground.  The campground is approximately 12 miles from the community of Paulina.

    Yellowjacket campground sits on the quiet shores of Yellowjacket Lake.  This beautiful and quiet location offers abundant birding and wildlife viewing opportunities with eagles, osprey and pronghorn antelope frequenting the area.  The lake has a small sand beach and an easily accessible shoreline for fishing.  This campground has a very nice covered group picnic area. Fishing is a popular activity at this campground. Boating - Non-Motorized boats only.

    Directions: From Burns, OR., travel west on US Highway 20 to the junction with the County Road 127/Forest Road 47.  Turn right onto County Road 127/ Forest Road 47 at the sign for Yellowjacket Lake and Delintment Lake.  Follow County Road 127/ Forest Road 47 for approximately 30 miles to the junction with Forest Road 37.  Turn right onto Forest Road 37 and continue on for approximately 2.3 miles to the junction with Forest Road 3745.  Turn right on to Forest Road 3745 and continue for 1 mile then turn right at the end of Yellowjacket Lake into the camping area.

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