Mile by Mile Map of the Oregon Coast Trail from Oswald West State Park to Cape Lookout State Park

42.8 Neahkahnie Beachis located at Manzanita just south of Neahkahnie Mountain and offers excellent fishing for redtail surfperch but the parking is limited. Follow the Ocean Road to Manzanita Beach. There is good fishing for redtail surfperch with ample parking.

The legend of buried treasure near Neahkahnie Mountain has treasure seekers searching for the elusive booty from the treasure laden Spanish Galleon, San Francisco Xavier, that wrecked on Nehalem spit in 1707. The legend was passed down by Clatsop Indians who observed shipwrecked Spaniards burying chests near the base of Neahkahnie Mountain and supported in fact by the large amount of beeswax that is found from time to time on Nehalem Spit.

43.9 Nehalem Beach is the located north of the entrance to Nehalem Bay on the Nehalem Bay Sand Spit.

Nehalem Bay State Park is a full service park located on Nehalem Beach below Manzanita Beach.

Snowy plover have shown nesting activity on the spit south of the day-use area. Please follow the posted instructions to protect them. More Information

The route to our address at 34600 Garey St. winds through a community. Kids, pets and wildlife are at play. Please be courteous, obey all traffic rules and take it slow. We'll still be here when you arrive!

Set between the ocean and the bay, Nehalem Bay State Park is situated on a 4 mile-long sand spit.  Just 86 miles west of Portland along the north Oregon Coast, the park features a campground and two day-use areas for the whole family.  

The campground, set amongst a sea of shore pine, borders rolling dunes along the beach.  Walk over the dunes and you’re at the beach building sand castles, flying a kite or relaxing to the sound of the ocean.  Beach-combing produces special rewards – treasures that include agates, shells, and occasionally glass floats. 

A forested 1.8 mile long bike path provides a breathtaking view of the bay. You may see deer and elk grazing, a coyote crossing the road and a variety of birds.  Kayaking, crabbing, fishing and clamming are popular activities. 

Park features include a 2,400 foot airstrip that offers the unique opportunity of a fly-in camp.  A hiker-biker camp offers sites for those walking and riding bikes. Yurts are available as an alternative camping experience. Primitive horse campsites offer horse enthusiasts camping with several miles of trails and beach to explore.  A horse concession is located in the beach-side day-use area during the summer months. 

45.7                             Nehalem Bay

46.5 The North Nehalem Fish Hatchery is accessed by traveling north on Hwy 101 and turning east on Hwy 53 or by traveling west from Portland on Hwy 26 and turning southwest on Hwy 53 to access the Nehalem Fish Hatchery. The Nehalem Fish Hatchery offers fishing opportunity for the disabled from the deck of the fishing platform for salmon and steelhead. The Salmonberry trailhead is accessed via State Hwy 53.

The Salmonberry Trail is 86 miles of adventure from Banks to Tillamook. Oregon's hiking, cycling, and equestrian trail.

For its entirety, the trail follows the century-old Pacific Railway and Navigation Company rail bed, which—due to its steep grades and sharp curves—gained the moniker, “Punk, Rotten and Nasty.” Relicts of its railroad heritage include 13 railroad tunnels and dozens of trestles, including the Big Baldwin Bridge, which offers a stunning view.

The east end of the trail will begin in the pastoral community of Banks at the foothills of the Coast Range. Here, it will connect to the popular 22-mile Banks-Vernonia State Trail, Oregon’s first rail-trail.

The western half of the trail, from Enright to Tillamook, will parallel an active line, the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad, in a scenario known as rail-with-trail. The organization offers tourist excursions down the coast using vintage locomotives and an all-volunteer crew.

The trail will end on the south side of Tillamook at the Port of Tillamook Bay’s Industrial Park, which includes an air museum that once served as a blimp hanger and, today, showcases various types of aircraft.

Access to the Salmonberry trailhead is gained by turning east onto Hwy 53 just north of Wheeler, OR. Continue to the Miami River Road. Turn right and proceed to Foss Road. Turn left at Foss Road to the Salmonberry trailhead at the Buick Creek Bridge.

Nehalem Bay, Oregon’s fourth largest bay and one of Oregon's premier crabbing bays and for digging large soft shell clams. Crabbing, fishing for salmon and steelhead and digging for softshell clams is very popular because of the bays proximity to Portland.

The entrance to Nehalem Bay at times becomes very rough and dangerous to cross. Nehalem Bay does not have a Coast Guard station or Bar Advisory Signs. During the summer, the Coast Guard broadcasts bar conditions on VHF channels 16 and 22A but only when a Coast Guard boat is patrolling the area. The USCG are heavy users of the Marine VHF Channels; Channel 16 is reserved for distress, safety and calling, while channel 22A is utilized for special warnings, Marine Safety and other announcements.

A whistle buoy is located 1 mile west of the entrance to bar at Nehalem Bay. The small boater has to use caution when considering crossing the bar or fishing in the jetty channel during the outgoing tide. The south jetty extends seaward for 600 yards. The following underlined areas describes some of tidal conditions when boating in the jetty channel or crossing the bar at Nehalem Bay.

Crab Rock: Crab Rock is located about 150 yards southeast of Jetty Fisheries Resort docks and is a hazard to small boats when it is covered by water. The hazard is sometimes marked by a privately maintained red buoy just westward of the rock. If the buoy is present, stay to the right of it when outbound and to the left when inbound.

Bar area: The entire area between the beach and the 30-foot curve is bar area and breaks on the ebbing current. The safest channel across the bar is subject to frequent change. Boaters proceeding out should stop just inside the entrance and carefully evaluate the bar. If the bar is breaking, do not cross. If you decide to cross, pick the calmest area and proceed, but do not attempt to turn around if the bar is breaking.

Entrance: The best water is close to the south jetty. The channel seaward of the jetties is continually shifting, and familiarity is needed to cross it safely. The range markers, therefore, do not necessarily show the exact channel and can also become obstructed by trees.

The emphasis in Nehalem Bay is on crabbing and salmon fishing. Fishing for salmon is excellent outside the jetty jaws but only do so in seaworthy boats. Surprisingly the fish species usually associated with most of Oregon’s developed deep water bays are not found in Nehalem Bay in great enough numbers to fish for them on a consistent basis.

The North Nehalem Fish Hatchery offers fishing opportunity for the disabled from the deck of the fishing platform for salmon and steelhead.

Clam Digging:

Nehalem Bay clam digging is very good but limited to softshell clams, purple varnish clams and butter clams. We thank clam digger, Dun and his family for sharing the photos of the clams they dug. The large softshell clams were from the north shore across the bay from the Wheeler Marina following the instructions of Jim the owner of Wheeler Marina. The purple varnish clams were dug from the tidal flats associated with the Nehalem State Park Boat ramp.

Crabbing in Nehalem Bay is renowned for its excellence for most of the year with the best crabbing occurring from early summer through late fall from the trestle just above Fishery Point seaward to the jetty channel.

The Jetty Fisher has the ideal location to intercept Dungeness crabs as they enter the bay on the south side of the jetty channel.

The Jetty Fishery is located at the mouth of Nehalem Bay. Crabbing from the Jetty Fishery crabbing dock as shown in the following video taken earlier this summer is great. The crabs enter Nehalem Bay along the channel that runs along the south side of the jetty channel and right into the crab rings at the Jetty Fishery Dock. The crabbing dock is closed at 5:00 pm.

Backing and shaking crab. How to humanly kill Dungeness and red rock crabs is the question my wife wants me to answer. She can't stand to see anything suffer. Striking the Thoracic ganglion with a crab mallet kills the crab immediately. The crab does not suffer as it would if submerged in boiling water and neither does my wife. Killing and backing the crabs prior to cooking them shortens the total time it takes to cook and clean large numbers of crabs.


Click on the following video clip to view a professional crab shaker picking Dungeness crabs. Shaking crabs rather than picking them cuts the time in half to shake and pick the meat from crabs.

Additional Information for Crabbing From Coastal Waters:

Click on the following links for additional information for taking crabs in the waters of the Pacific Northwest. ODFW's website crab page or Washington State information on recreational crabbing, California's information on recreational crabbing. Click on Alaska's comments on Dungeness Crabs and permits and regulations for SE Alaska, or click on Dungeness Crabs at Netarts Bay. Click on Species Profile for Dungeness Crabs PDF file. Click on Species Profile for Red Rock Crabs to view PDF file. Click on Dungeness and Red Rock Crabs to view information on taking crabs from Oregon's Bays and ocean water.

Fishing the Nehalem:

Chinook salmon return to Nehalem Bay in small numbers beginning the first week of July and in some years depending on the number of returning fish the fishing can be as hot as a 4th of July fireworks show. The summer run peaks in early August. The first week of September usually signals the return of the fall Chinook run. Fall Chinook salmon are present in Nehalem Bay and lower tidal reach of the Nehalem River from September peaking in early October and running into early November. The age class of the returning Chinook is usually comprised of mature 5 year old fish. ODFW combines statistical catch data for the summer and fall runs averaging approximately 2300 fish per year. Fish both runs using the same tackle and techniques.

The best fishing for newly arriving fall Chinook salmon occurs in the lower bay during the incoming tide of the major tidal exchange of spring tides or neap tides especially when the incoming tide coincides with sunrise or sunset. The next most productive fishing period occurs at sunrise or sunset during the incoming tide of the minor tidal exchange in the daily tidal cycle.

Daybreak is that magical time of day when Chinook salmon bite the best. Be sure to have the bait in the water one half hour before sunrise. Fishing is most productive from ½ hour before sunrise to midmorning and from late afternoon until ½ hour after sunset. Early in the run troll a plug cut herring with or against the incoming tide or with outgoing tide from Fishery Point seaward. Troll the plug cut herring in the channel that parallels the east shore and the south jetty. The velocity of the tidal current in the lower bay requires the use of heavy sinkers up to 12 plus ounces to keep the bait in the Chinook’s strike zone.

As the number of returning Chinook salmon increase troll a plug cut herring or a bait wrapped Flatfish lure colored with a silver body and chartreuse head or Hot Tail finish in the deepwater channel in the bend of river at the Community of Wheeler or in the channel opposite of Deer Island. Remember Chinook salmon often bite prior to and after the tide change. As high tide approaches, Chinook salmon will often mill around in the area between the Community of Wheeler and Fishery Point. Trolling a rainbow colored spinner such as the Yaquina Slammer on the tidal flats just above the deepwater channel during a last hour of the incoming tide often produces fish.

Troll with the incoming tide or back troll, back bounce or troll with the outgoing tide from the Highway 101 Bridge to the confluence with the North Fork using a plug cut herring, bait wrapped Flatfish lures or with spinners. The depth of the channel above Fishery Point varies with the contour of the bottom and underscores the importance of using LCD marine electronics. Increase the trolling speed in the shallow water reach of the channel lifting the bait in the water column to avoid hanging it up on the bottom. Lower the trolling speed as the channel deepens. Chinook salmon often react to the change of speed by striking the bait.

Anchor on the up current side of the deeper holes located from the Highway 101 Bridge upstream to the head of tidewater at the Roy Creek County Park. Fishing on the bottom with bait wrapped Flatfish lures, spinner bait combinations, spinners, bait sweetened Spin–N–Glos, wobblers or with a walnut sized gob of salmon eggs are effective options.

Bobber fish through the deeper holes from the head of tidewater at Roy Creek County Park to the Highway 101 bridge during the last half of an outgoing tide through slack tide using a gob of salmon eggs the size of a walnut and sand shrimp. The most productive holes are located just above and below Roy Creek Park and the reach of the river upstream from the confluence with the North Fork.

Coho salmon return to Nehalem Bay from August through September. Fish early in the run in the lower bay from Fishery Point seaward trolling plug cut herring, hoochies or a streamer flies with the incoming tide. Troll these baits with a diver or wire spreader or diver in the upper half of the water column. Troll in the upper bay with rainbow, chartreuse or pink colored spinners or with spinner bait combinations.

Steelhead fishing in the Nehalem basin offers abundant steelhead fishing opportunities. Hatchery steelhead (90,000 smolts) are released in the North Fork Nehalem at or below Nehalem Hatchery on Hwy 53. The best fishing for hatchery steelhead is usually in December and January, with the first fish appearing by mid-November most years. Hatchery steelhead are recycled regularly from Nehalem Hatchery during the peak of the run. Call 503-368-5670 for recorded fishing information.

Fishing for wild steelhead in February and March can be productive and it’s usually much less crowded.ODFW will be conducting a radio telemetry study of steelhead migration patterns beginning in December 2013. Anglers may catch steelhead with a radio tag antenna protruding from the mouth. A temporary rule for this winter allows anglers to keep hatchery steelhead that have been radio tagged. Anglers are asked to return the radio tag to ODFW (drop off at Nehalem Hatchery or other ODFW office) so that it can be re-used. Do not remove radio tags from steelhead that are released. Anglers may also encounter steelhead with Floy tags inserted near the dorsal fin. Please report these fish to ODFW, including any numbers on the tags (if present).

Bank access on the North Fork is available near the hatchery and on neighboring industrial forestlands. The Nehalem Hatchery Barrier Free Fishing Platform offers additional access to anglers with a disabled angler permit. Boaters may float the North Fork below the hatchery, but extreme caution is necessary. Several bedrock rapids make drifting this river hazardous, and it should be attempted by only experienced boaters. Rafts are highly recommended.

The main Nehalem River is a very productive catch-and-release fishery for wild steelhead. Best fishing is February to early April. Some very large steelhead (occasionally topping 20 pounds) are caught from this river. Access is along Nehalem River Road. The lower river can be boated from the Beaver Slide (below Nehalem Falls) to Roy Creek County Park.

The Salmonberry River, a tributary of the Nehalem about 7 miles above Nehalem Falls, can provide superb fishing for large winter steelhead. The Salmonberry closes March 31. Access to the Salmonberry remains limited. The Nehalem River Road bridge over the Salmonberry has been rebuilt and is now open; however, the railroad right of way remains closed to public access. Anglers are advised to check with the Port for current status of access restrictions.

Cutthroat trout return to the Nehalem River Basin beginning as early as the middle of July but most often from August through September. Fish from the Community of Wheeler to the confluence of the North Fork from middle of July into September trolling Doc Shelton spinners rigged with night crawlers.

Fish in the upper tidal reach of the North Fork or in the main stem Nehalem River using night crawlers, crawfish tails or by casting ¼ ounce yellow or white Roostertail spinners.

Black rockfish enter Nehalem Bay from April through October but withdraw from the bay during periods of heavy freshwater runoff from seasonal storms from November through March and into deeper water during the daylight hours. The fishing is for black and blue rockfish is the most inconsistent for any of Oregon’s large bays. Historic and current catch statistics reflect the poor fishing. The most productive fishing should occur in the jetty channel during the incoming tide shortly after sunset.

Striped seaperch, pileperch, walleye surfperch, redtail surfperch and white seaperch enter the bay in late spring. Schools of perch move onto the tidal flats feeding heavily on intertidal animals. The fishing ranges from fair to excellent through fall depending on the tides and the weather conditions.

When the dynamics of the tide are at work in the bay, fish in the area of current breaks whirlpools and rip tides. At times, during the incoming or outgoing tide, current lines appear between the tidal flats and the adjacent deeper water. Use the current lines as a guide to the channels that drain the tidal flats. To assure success the angler should tour the bay during low tide to identify the locations where perch can be intercepted during the incoming tide. Low tide also provides the angler the opportunity to pump shrimp.

Fish for perch in the channel along the south jetty and around Crab Rock. Fish in the main channel along the east shore from the Jetty Fishery upstream to the railroad trestle above Fishery Point. Fish along main channel that drains the tidal flats of the north shore from the Oregon State Park to the community of Wheeler.

Kelp greenling, whitespotted greenling and rock greenling enter the bay in small numbers with the tide. The fishing is rated fair at best, and the best fishing occurs late spring through summer months in the channel along the south jetty.

White sturgeon enter Nehalem Bay from the middle of December through July. Typically, fishing is intermittent from day to day ranging from poor one day to excellent the next. The sturgeon fishery ranks 5th overall when compared to Oregon’s other bays averaging 74 fish per year. The most productive baits are mud and/or sand shrimp. The best locations to fish are on the south end of Deer Island and Dean’s Point. Sturgeon are also caught in the holes along the south shore between Fishery Point and the community of Wheeler. One of the better locations is the Airport Hole, which is located on the south side of the airport near Nehalem State Park. Fish the deeper holes in the river channel to the head of tidewater.

Lingcod spawn along the outer portion of south jetty from late January through April. The best fishing should occur during the peak of the spawning period from late February through early April but the fishing is rated inconsistent at best.

Cabezon should be present in the rocky structure of the south jetty but the fishing is inconsistent.

Bank fishing for salmon from the Nehalem Bay State Park using bobbers or by casting spinners from shore. Plunking for salmon with sand shrimp and/or salmon eggs is also productive, but the crabs often eat the bait before the salmon can take it. Fish for perch from the railroad trestle above Fishery Point or from Brighton seaward to the south jetty but access is limited by private property.

Nehalem Bay JettyThe South Jetty offers better fishing than the north jetty.  Access the South Jetty by turning west from Highway 101 onto Nedonna Beach Road.  Park at the end of the road and walk to the jetty.  

Nehalem Bay boat launches on the south shore are the Jetty Fishery, the Brighton boat ramp, the Paradise Cove Resort, the Wheeler Public boat launch and the Nehalem Bay boat ramp.  The North shore boat launch is located at Nehalem Bay State Park.  Launch at Roy Creek Park to access the head of tidewater.  Roy Creek Park is located off of Foss Road via State Hwy 53.

Internet Links of Interest for Nehalem Bay:

Click on the Oregon Coast Today to view the current events of interest to all on the Oregon Coast.

Click on the tidal projections for the Nehalem River Estuary at Brighton.

Click on the NOAA tidal projections for the Brighton area of Nehalem Bay.

Click on Nehalem at Foss to display the height of the river level for the Nehalem River near Foss

Click on the local weather forecast for Nehalem Bay and surronding area.

Click on the following link to view the Marine Weather Forecast from Zone Forecast: Coastal waters from Cape Shoalwater WA to Cascade Head OR out 10 nm.

46.9 Wheeler Oregon is arguably the Kayak Capital of the Oregon Coast. The wild and scenic Nehalem Bay has something for everyone from the amazing vista from the streets of Wheeler to the recreational adventures waiting to embarce all that accept the challenge of the adventure.

Wheeler Marina at 278 Marine Drive Wheeler, Oregon 97147, 503-368-5780 is Kayak Central for the Oregon Coast. Jim rents 60 Kayaks and has the ability to rent to large groups. The kayaks are the larger recreational sized Kayaks. The wildlife is diverse on Nehalem Bay and you never know what species you will encounter. Wheeler Marina is located at 278 Marine Drive in Wheeler, Oregon 97147. Call Jim at 503-368-5780 for additional information. We are right in the center of Wheeler with plenty of parking, kayaks for sale/rent, crab boat rentals, licenses, mooring, a crab cooker, snacks, tackle, and friendly advice on what to see & how to do it.

48.9 Nedonna Beach is located a mile south of the entrance to Nehalem Bay. Nedonna Beach is renowned for excellent redtail surfperch fishing.

Nedonna Lake a 1 acre lake is located in the Nedonna Beach area and is stocked with rainbow trout. The lake is a small body of water and ideal for children to fish because it is easily accessible and safe. There are no docks and a limited amount of shoreline, so it is easy for adults to keep an eye on their children while the kids get the feeling of fishing on their own. To access the lake take the Manhattan Beach turnoff on U.S. Highway 101 — Beach Street. The lake is near the junction of Nedonna Avenue and Beach Street. Turn north on Nedonna Avenue and the lake is a short block to the north.

48.9 Manhattan Beach is accessible from Highway 101 north of Garibaldi. Turn west from Highway 101 at the Nedonna Beach Road and left into the Manhattan Beach Wayside. There are picnic tables, restrooms and ample parking for all R/V vehicles. There is good to excellent fishing for surfperch.

50.1 Lake Lytle is located on Hwy 101 in Rockway Beach, and is generously stocked with hatchery rainbow trout. The lake also contains largemouth bass, sunfish and bullhead catfish. There is fishing dock located off of Hwy 101 as well as a boat launch and fishing dock located on the north end of the lake via 12th Ave. Crescent Lake is just north of Lake Lytle and is considered part of the Lake Lytle fishery. The lake is separated from U.S. Highway 101 by private property. Northeast Lake Boulevard skirts the woods around the lake to the north and east.

50.8 Rockaway Beach is accessible from Highway 101 north of Garibaldi and is renowned for redtail surfperch fishing. There is ample parking located west of Highway 101 by turning west at the U.S. Bank sign. Access to the beach at Rockaway Beach.

Lake Marie is a small lake just east of U.S. Highway 101 between Minnehaha and Washington streets. It is the site of the Stanger Memorial VFW Park and a community garden.

Spring Lake a 16.8 acre lake is located at the south end of Rockaway Beach on the east side of U.S. Highway 101. The lake is 13 acres, but is mostly surrounded by private land. Public bank access is restricted to the highway shoulder. Parking along the highway is limited, with few wide spots, and extreme caution should be used. Because of safety concerns, this lake is not the most suitable for children to fish. Legal rainbow and cutthroat trout are stocked annually from mid-March through early May. Some large-mouth bass are present, but seldom caught by bank anglers.

Smith Lake a 42.2 acre lakes located south of Rockaway Beach on the west side of U.S. Highway 101. Private land surrounds most of this lake. Camp Magruder borders the lake on the west. Bank access is limited from the highway side and requires a short trail walk over uneven terrain. Adequate parking is available on the highway shoulder. Children and older anglers would find easier and safer access at other lakes around the county. Stocking occurs during April with legal-size rainbow and cutthroat trout. There are no public docks or boat launches that access this lake. Small numbers of large-mouth bass are present, but few are caught by bank anglers.

53.8 The Barview Jetty produces the highest catch ratio of fish caught per angler of any jetty on the Oregon Coast according to the local fishermen. The jetty extends 800 yards seaward. The western most 80 yards of the jetty is submerged. To access the Barview Jetty drive north from Garibaldi on Highway 101 take the Barview Jetty exit. Park and walk out to the jetty or drive through the county and park. The Barview Jetty is more accessible than the south jetty. The fishing for rockfish is more productive off of the Barview Jetty than from the south jetty. The jetty channel runs deeper along the Barview Jetty than it does along the south jetty. The Barview Jetty is the access point to the southern section of Rockaway Beach located just north of the entrance to Tillamook Bay. The fishing is excellent for perch from the Barview Jetty or for redtail surfperch from the southern section of Rockaway Beach.

Tillamook area rivers are the are home to some of Oregon’s finest steelhead and salmon fishing. The diversity of Tillamook Bay provides the angler with the opportunity to plan combination trips. Set out crab pots in the early morning before daylight and fish for Chinook salmon during a high incoming tide in the lower tidal reach of the bay, or dig for clams and pump for sand shrimp in the lower bay during an outgoing minus tide and fish for perch on the incoming tide. Being prepared to make the most of your opportunities can turn an ordinary outing into an exceptional one.

53.8 Tillamook Bay at the Barview Jetty: Located just north of Garibaldi, the Barview Jetty County Park is a great place to stay while on your clam digging and crabbing adventures. The jetty provides the opportunity to fish for salmon, perch and shallow water rockfish. Fishing from the North Jetty is rated the most productive of any Jetty on the Oregon coast. Use a crab snare to take Dungeness crabs while fishing for black rock or perch. Bait the crab snare with herring purchased from the Barview Store. The following video clip of 4 limits of Dungeness crabs.

54.0 The Three Graces are famous landmarks that denotes the beginning of the jetty channel.

55.4 View the train at Rockaway by clicking on the following link in red. Enjoy a trip into history by taking a ride on the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad. The steam driven locomotive train departs the fishing port of Garibaldi to the resort beach community of Rockaway. Click on the Schedule to purchase tickets on the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad. Look for future rail excursions to the Salmonberry Trailhead.

The Salmonberry Trail is 86 miles of adventure featuring hiking, cycling and and an equestrian trail from Banks to Tillamook.

For its entirety, the trail follows the century-old Pacific Railway and Navigation Company rail bed, which—due to its steep grades and sharp curves—gained the moniker, “Punk, Rotten and Nasty.” Relicts of its railroad heritage include 13 railroad tunnels and dozens of trestles, including the Big Baldwin Bridge, which offers a stunning view.

The east end of the trail will begin in the pastoral community of Banks at the foothills of the Coast Range. Here, it will connect to the popular 22-mile Banks-Vernonia State Trail, Oregon’s first rail-trail.

The western half of the trail, from Enright to Tillamook, will parallel an active line, the Oregon Coast Scenic Railroad, in a scenario known as rail-with-trail. The organization offers tourist excursions down the coast using vintage locomotives and an all-volunteer crew.

The trail will end on the south side of Tillamook at the Port of Tillamook Bay’s Industrial Park, which includes an air museum that once served as a blimp hanger and, today, showcases various types of aircraft.

55.7                            Tillamook Bay

Captain Robert Gray crossed the bar at Tillamook Bay in the sloop Lady Washington August 14, 1788.  Captain Gray originally named Tillamook Bay, Murders Bay, after Indians killed one of his crewmen, but the bay was later renamed in honor of the Tillamook Indian Tribe.  The Indian word, “Tillamook” means land of many waters.  The Miami, Kilchis, Wilson, Trask and Tillamook Rivers flow into Tillamook Bay.

Tillamook Bay is the second largest and most accessible bay on the Oregon coast, because the bay is so accessible, recreational clam diggers, crabbers and fishermen are able to fulfill their expectations.  The Brad Dawson tidewater access facility is an example of just how recreational friendly Tillamook Bay is.  It is handicapped accessible and is located on the Netarts Highway at the confluence of the Tillamook River and South Fork of the Trask River

Fishing in the open ocean or in the jetty channel requires seaworthy boats and experienced skippers because the Tillamook bar is one of the most dangerous to cross.  More than one fisherman has lost his life while trying to cross the bar on an outgoing tide.  Seaworthy boats are required for safe boating inside the bay to deal with large wind generated waves.  Call the Coast Guard at 1-360-642-3565 for a report of local bar conditions and the extended marine forecast.  The Coast Guard also broadcasts bar conditions on VHF channels 16 and 22A. The USCG are heavy users of the Marine VHF Channels; Channel 16 is reserved for distress, safety and calling, while channel 22A is utilized for special warnings, Marine Safety and other announcements.

NOAA's Bar Observation Website for Oregon's Bays. Check the NOAA Bar Observations website for updated bar closures and restrictions.

The following underlined areas of the Tillamook Bar as listed on the Web Pages of the Oregon State Marine Board. Click on Tillamook Bay to view the areas described as the dangerous tidal conditions affecting safe boating when entering of departing Tillamook.

Bar area. The entire area between the beach and the 20-foot curve is bar area and breaks on the ebbing tide. The water runs out from four to six knots on the average and is very strong. Boaters proceeding out should stop in the channel east of the seaward end of the breakwater and carefully evaluate the bar. If you decide to cross, proceed out - but do not attempt to turn around if the bar is breaking.

North jetty. About 100 yards of the outer end of the north jetty is submerged. This area and the portion of the channel just south of it are extremely dangerous. Avoid the sunken jetty and use caution in the channel south of it.

Middle grounds. Shoaling makes this area unpredictable and hazardous; it should be avoided.

South jetty. About 100 yards of the outer end of the south jetty is submerged. Use caution and avoid the sunken jetty when entering or exiting.

Tillamook Bay channel lies just south of the north jetty. Navigate with extreme caution. This channel changes constantly because of continuous natural silting and scouring. Obtain up-to-date information on channel conditions from the Coast Guard or other authoritative local sources. Do not rely on the range markers without first inquiring whether they mark the present channel location.

Tillamook Bay is Oregon's premier fishing bays. The salmon fishing is legendary and the fishing for rockfish off of the north jetty is the most productive for any of Oregon's bays.

Fishing In Tillamook Bay

I took a video clip of the Salmon Fishing in Tillamook Bay and was lucky enough to catch some footage of anglers at the Ghost Hole and one angler landing a salmon off of the Bar View Jetty.

Last year members of the Longview Hill Fishing Club struck gold in the form of Chinook Salmon. I am a member of the club and wanted to share the excitement of their adventure with my friends. Bill

If you are in need of clam digging equipment or crab gear while visiting the Tillamook Bay - Netarts Bay area stop by the family owned Tillamook Sporting Goods located on the west side of Hwy 101 across the street from Burger King in Tillamook or call 503 842 4334. Tillamook Sporting Goods is located 14 minutes from Netarts Bay to thewest via 3rd St or to Garibaldi via Hwy 101 north of Tillamook. Cheryl and her staff can provide all the equipment necessary for your recreational needs.

The diversity of Tillamook Bay provides the angler with the opportunity to plan combination trips. Set out crab pots in the early morning before daylight and fish for Chinook salmon during a high incoming tide in the lower tidal reach of the bay, or dig for clams and pump for sand shrimp in the lower bay during an outgoing minus tide and fish for perch on the incoming tide. Being prepared to make the most of your opportunities can turn an ordinary outing into an exceptional one.

Chinook salmon INFORMATION REPORTS NUMBER 2008-01 Click on the Chinook Salmon link to read the entire report.

Oregon North Coast Spring Chinook Stock Assessment – 2005-06 for the Nestucca, Wilson and Trask Rivers

INTRODUCTION: Chinook salmon populations of the Oregon coast exhibit two general life history types, classified as either spring-run or fall-run depending on adult life-history traits. Fall Chinook are present in most Oregon coastal basins, and the Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife (ODFW) has identified 28 fall Chinook populations in this area (ODFW 2005). Spring Chinook salmon are found in larger river basins on the Oregon coast, and the upper portions of the Umpqua and Rogue rivers. This is a more limited distribution than coastal fall Chinook and includes only 10 populations (ODFW 2005). Oregon coastal fall Chinook stocks have been monitored through a set of 56 standard spawning ground surveys, many conducted since the 1950’s. There has not been a similar, consistent, coast-wide monitoring program for Oregon coastal spring Chinook spawners. Abundance of these populations has been monitoring through a variety of methods including; freshwater harvest estimates, counts at dams and weirs, summer resting hole counts, and spawning ground surveys.

Chinook Salmon return to Tillamook Bay during the spring, fall and in winter. The age class of the returning Chinook is usually comprised of high percentage of 5 year old fish followed by 4 year old and larger 6 year old fish. Spring Chinook salmon begin returning to Tillamook Bay in May peaking in late May into early June but only fin clipped fish may be retained. The highest number of spring Chinook are returning to the Trask and Wilson Rivers respectively with a smaller number straying into the Kilchis and Tillamook Rivers. Fish spring Chinook salmon in the lower bay using the same methods used fishing for fall Chinook salmon.

Fall Chinook begin returning to the bay the last week of August increasing in September and peaking in October with the highest number of Chinook salmon returning to the Trask and Wilson Rivers respectively and fewer Chinook salmon returning to the Tillamook, Kilchis and Miami Rivers. During the fall run the early returning salmon are mostly returning to the Trask River. After September 15th Chinook salmon begin returning to the Wilson and Tillamook Rivers. A small number of Winter Chinook return in November and December to the Wilson River.

Early during the spring and fall runs the best salmon fishing occurs in the ocean below the south jetty and to a lesser extent above the north jetty trolling a plug cut herring behind a herring dodger or flasher along the 20 or 30 foot curve north or south of the jetties. During the peak of the runs the most productive fishing occurs in the lower bay trolling a plug cut herring with the incoming tide in the channel along the north jetty from the jetty jaws to Kincheloe Point. Troll a plug cut herring from late May through the middle of June and from the middle of September through the middle of October with the tide from west of the Coast Guard Station to Garibaldi up the Bay City channel through the Ghost Hole to Sandstone Point. Once past the Ghost Hole add spinners and Kwikfish lures to the trolling mix through Bay City. Trolling for Chinook salmon in the south channel is not as popular as in the Bay City channel but can be as productive for Chinook returning to the Trask and Tillamook Rivers. Troll in the south channel from Kincheloe Point through Crab Harbor to a point opposite of the Oyster Fish Haven with a plug cut herring. The velocity of the tidal current in the lower bay requires sinkers 6 to 20 ounces tied to an 18 to 24 inch dropper to keep the bait in the Chinook’s strike zone.

Chinook salmon migrate upriver to the spawning grounds during high water years but in low water years they will mill around in the upper bay above Bay City before moving into the tidal reach of the river channels awaiting the freshets from spring or fall rains. Troll in the upper bay from Memaloose Point through the Picket Fences or from the Oyster House Hole through the Sheep Corral to Bay City using spinners with green accents and rainbow colored spinner blade or with a 50–50 green or chartreuse and hammered brass blade, or bait wrapped Flatfish lures with a silver body and chartreuse head or Hot Tail finish. Troll these baits next to the bottom utilizing light weight sinkers up to 2 ounce in the shallow water of the tidal flats and in the deepwater channels of the upper bay associated with the Bay City channel or the south channel. Fish only in the Main channel or in the south channel above crab harbor to Boulder Point with local knowledge. For information and fishing gear Tillamook Sporting Goods has it all.

The Trask and Wilson rivers are the largest rivers entering Tillamook Bay followed by the Kilchis, Tillamook and the Miami Rivers. The highest percentage of the Chinook salmon returning to Tillamook Bay are returning to the Trask and Wilson Rivers respectively with a lower percentage returning to the Tillamook River. Fish for spring Chinook in the tidal reach of the Trask and Wilson River in June using the same tackle and methods used to fish for fall Chinook. Fish for fall Chinook salmon holding in the lower tidal reach of the Trask River from early September and in the Tillamook River from mid September and in the Wilson River from early September; fishing through October. Fish for winter run Chinook salmon in the lower tidal reach of the Wilson River from November into December.

The most productive fishing in the lower tidal reach of the Trask, Wilson and Tillamook Rivers occurs when the incoming tide coincides with daybreak. Troll bait wrapped Flatfish lures with the incoming tide to intercept migrating fish or anchoring above the deeper holes and fish the lures near the bottom waiting for the fish to come to you. After sunrise add a rainbow colored spinner and/or a spinner bait combination to the trolling mix and fish through high slack tide. When the tide begins ebb drift with the outgoing tide back bouncing a walnut sized gob of salmon eggs topped with a sand shrimp along the bottom or bobber fish a walnut sized gob of salmon eggs suspended just off of the bottom. Anchor above the deeper holes and bobber fish with salmon eggs and/or a sand shrimp during the outgoing tide through low slack tide, or depending of current velocity fish on the bottom with bait wrapped Flatfish lures, spinners, spinner bait combinations, Spin–N–Glos or with an assortment of wobblers.

Coho salmon return in September peaking in October and running into November but only adipose fin clipped coho may be retained. Fish in the lower bay trolling either a whole herring, plug cut herring, a hoochie sweetened with a chunk of herring, streamer flies or with spinners in the upper half of the water column from the jetty jaws to Garibaldi. The best fishing occurs in the upper bay occurs at high incoming tide from Bay City south trolling a rainbow, chartreuse or pink colored spinner or with a spinner bait combinations. Most of the coho salmon are returning to the Trask River with smaller numbers returning to the Wilson and Tillamook Rivers.

Steelhead fishing in the Wilson, Kilchis and Trask rivers offer good access to some great wild winter steelhead fishing, which peaks in March.

The Wilson, Kilchis and Trask rivers offer excellent winter steelhead opportunities. Hatchery steelhead usually begin returning in late November, with good fishing through January. Approximately 40,000 early returning hatchery smolts are released in each of the Kilchis and Wilson Rivers. The Kilchis is stocked up to Kilchis Park. An additional 100,000 wild brood smolts are released in the Wilson River, primarily in the lower river up to Siskeyville, but a small proportion (25 percent) are released in the South Fork. Wild broodstock hatchery steelhead are available in the Wilson River throughout the winter and early spring (primarily January to mid-April). The Trask River is not stocked, but hatchery strays are present.

Hwy 6 follows the Wilson River from the lower reaches to the fishing deadline at the South Fork. The Little North Fork Wilson River and first mile of the South Fork Wilson River are open Dec. 1- March 31 for steelhead fishing. These streams provide good opportunities when the main stem Wilson River is high.

The Kilchis River is accessible at the Mapes Creek launch, Kilchis Park, and along Kilchis Forest Road up to the deadline at the confluence of the North and South forks.

The Trask River is accessible at Trask Hatchery and Loren’s Drift off Chance Road and along Trask River Road. The North and South Fork Trask (open Dec. 1 to March 31) are accessible by forest roads that follow each stream. The North Fork Trask deadline is at Bark Shanty Creek and the South Fork deadline is at Edwards Creek.

The Tillamook and Miami rivers are open to steelhead fishing though March. A few stray hatchery fish and smaller populations of wild fish are present in each stream. The Miami River offers access in the upper stretches along Miami Forest Road; however, public access is very limited on the Tillamook River.

Cutthroat trout return to the Wilson, Trask and Kilchis rivers from the middle of July into October with the highest percentage of cutthroat trout returning to the Trask River and a smaller but equal percentage returning to the Wilson and Kilchis Rivers. The most productive fishing occurring in the tidal reach of the three rivers occurs from the middle of July through August trolling Doc Shelton spinners rigged with night crawlers or by casting spinners.

Black rockfish, copper rockfish and blue rockfish enter Tillamook Bay early as March but usually from April through October withdrawing from the bay during periods of heavy seasonal freshwater runoff in winter and into deeper water during the daylight hours. Black rockfish are by far the dominate shallow water rockfish caught in the bay in declining numbers from along the north jetty to Barview, Garibaldi and the Larson Pond culvert. The north jetty is the most productive location to fish for all three species of shallow water rockfish. Copper rockfish are caught in declining numbers from the north jetty to Garibaldi. The most productive fishing occurs in the jetty channel and in the lower bay during an incoming tide after sunset or at daybreak as the shallow water rockfish enter the bay to feed. Remember if you’re going to fish in the jetty channel at night do so only on an incoming tide and when the ocean is clam.

Pileperch, striped seaperch, redtail surfperch, walleye surfperch and white seaperch enter the bay with the tide during the spring in large numbers feeding heavily on intertidal animals. Fishing ranges from fair to excellent through summer into fall depending on the tides, weather conditions and the amount of freshwater runoff entering the bay. Striped seaperch are the dominant perch species in the lower bay and fishing for them at the Three Graces can be red hot on both the incoming and out going tides. Fish for striped seaperch, pileperch, redtail surfperch and walleye surfperch from shore at the Three Graces, Hobsonville Point, the Ghost Hole or Sandstone Point. Fishing in the Bay City channel, the main channel and the south channel is productive during both the incoming and outgoing tide. The perch follow the channels with the tide up the bay to Bay City.

Kelp greenling, rock greenling and whitespotted greenling are year–round residents. Statistically Tillamook Bay produces the highest catch rate for greenling for any of Oregon’s bays. Fishing is the best in the spring into summer and poorest during periods of heavy seasonal rainfall and flooding. By far the best fishing is located in the rocky structure along the north jetty followed by Barview and the Larson Pond culvert with a smaller number being caught in the structure associated with the Port of Garibaldi.

Lingcod fishing improves along the north jetty and the Barview jetty from late January with the best fishing occurring from late February to early April along the north jetty followed by Barview Jetty. The slowest fishing occurs from May through December.

Cabezon fishing along the north jetty ranges from poor to fair throughout the year. Angler should concentrate fish during the peak of the spawning period from February into March. Fishing for cabezon over the submerged portion of the north jetty is exceptional from early spring but it should only be attempted when the ocean is flat calm.

White sturgeon are present in the bay for most of the year. The catch ratio of keeper sturgeon caught for the number of hours fished is the highest of Oregon’s bays. Sturgeon enter Tillamook Bay in December. The best fishing is from the middle of December through May with the emphasis in February and March. The fishing in the bay declines during June and July and is slow until December. The most productive time to fish is during the last two hours of the outgoing tide through low slack tide. Fish with mud and/or sand shrimp in the holes, shallow depressions or along the slope of the banks associated with the south, main or Bay City channels, the Sheep Coral or the area from the Picket Fence to Memaloose Point. Fish in the shallow depressions and holes associated with the tidal reach of the river channels of the Wilson, Trask and Tillamook rivers. The fishing declines in the bay as the sturgeon move into the tidal reach of the Tillamook River and to a lesser extent into the Wilson and Trask Rivers. The fishing in the Tillamook River is usually consistent from July through September and at times through October into November but is sporadic in the Wilson and Trask Rivers. Call the area’s tackle shops to find the area of the bay with the hot bite.

Sand Sole enter Tillamook Bay in small numbers from April through August.

Bank fishing – Fish for Chinook salmon and white sturgeon off the back of the large wooden deck at the Brad Dawson tidewater access facility and from the turnouts along the road that parallels the Tillamook River.  We recommend biking or hiking to Crab Harbor and fish for salmon and perch along the south channel in Crab Harbor via the Bayocean Road.  Fish for salmon in the lower reach of the Trask River at the Hospital Hole by driving west on Third Street to the green trailer and paying a nominal fee. The Hospital Hole is often closed.  Fish for salmon, perch or sturgeon from the Ghost Hole Turnout at milepost 58.6 on Highway 101.  Fish for perch on either side of the culvert to Larson Pond, at Sandstone Point, Hobsonville Point which is located at milepost 58.0 and at the Three Graces, which is located at Milepost 54.4. 

Tillamook Bay at the Port of Garibaldi is the second largest and most accessible bay on the Oregon coast, because the bay is so accessible, recreational clam diggers, crabbers and fishermen are able to fulfill their expectations.

The Garibaldi Marina is a full service marina offering a large array of products and services. Jeff reminds everyone to use caution when boating in the bay during the high velocity of clam tides. The Garibaldi Marina at 503 322 3312 is operating on Summer Hours. Garibaldi Marina begins operating on Winter hours on December 1st. Jeff operates a fleet of rental boats all in top condition. However the boats are rented to crab, clam or fish in the bay during the incoming tide only. Crabbing is always better when you're in a boat!!! Rental Boats are done by reservation only. Reservations are accepted no more than 7 to 10 days in advance.

The Garibaldi Marina is a full service marina offering a large array of products and services. When I visited Jeff at the Garibaldi Marina the first thing I noticed that everything was neat and stowed where it belonged, see photo below. Jeff rents everything you need to make you trip a success. Boat rentals are reasonable priced and by reservation only. Boats are only rented during the incoming tide so consult the tide table link below to plan your trip.. Jeff, his wife, Val and their two boys, Cody and Casey operate the Garibaldi Marina. Click on the image of the photo to enlarge it.

Safety is our number one priority at Garibaldi Marina. It is this reason that we can only rent our boats on the INCOMING tide with favorable weather conditions. Please plan accordingly.

We rent 16 foot aluminum boats with well maintained late model 8 hp motors. All required safety equipment is included with the rental at no additional charge. Coast Guard regulations do not allow more than 5 persons on board including children.

At the time of rental we will go over a map of the bay, detailing where to go and where the crabbing is good.

We will also go over safety procedures, boat and motor operation and take time to answer any and all questions you may have. Please arrive a little early to allow time for this. Already experienced with boats and our area? Then please be patient and enjoy our refresher course! Crab image by Garibaldi Marina. Click on the image to enlarge it.

We rent crab rings! Crab rings are a little different than crab pots. The primary difference is that you need to check crab rings more often, we recommend checking them about every ten minutes. Please feel free to bring your own gear or rent or purchase from us.

RATES

Boat rentals - $80 first three hours / $10 each additional hour as tide and weather allow.
Crab Rings - $6 each for the day. Back by end of business day - No overnight rentals.
Crab bait - $3.00 each
Crab Cooking - First 12 crab FREE with boat rental!

The most common package we put together for our customers is a 3 hour boat rental / 3 crab rings / 6 crab bait for a total cost of $116.

We rent crab rings! Crab rings are a little different than crab pots or traps. The primary difference is that you need to check crab rings more often, we recommend checking them about every ten minutes from a boat and about every fifteen minutes when crabbing off the docks.

We also rent clam rakes! Clam rakes are great for harvesting many kinds of bay clams. Locally you can find Gapers, Butters, Cockles, Littlenecks, & Softshells.

Both Crab Rings and Clam Rakes are a $6.00 Rental and are due back an hour before the end of the business day. Sorry - No overnight rentals.

ODFW Crab and Clam Distribution Maps for Tillamook Bay
Click on the Seacor Shellfish Areas for Tillamook Bay to link to ODFW's maps of the shellfish.

The Port of Garibaldi offers crabbing and/or fishing from the public dock at the intersection of 7th and Commercial and from the Pier's End crabbing dock at 12 Avenue.

Crabbing off of the 7th. Ave. Crabbing Dock.

Crabbing off of the 12th. Ave. Crabbing Dock.

Ocean Crabbing:

Combination trips for fish and crab pay off for my friends. Last year my friend Tim reported the he and his friends took 44 crabs in 2 days last while fishing for lingcod and rockfish out of Tillamook Bay. They set the pots in 35 feet of water 1 mile south of the entrance to Tillamook Bay. My friend Tim took the crabs in the same area that my friend Jerry did in the following images below while fishing for coho salmon. Sometimes it pays to take advantage of your recreational opportunities by taking crabs and catching coho salmon. Notice the coho in the cooler with the crabs. Click on the images to enlarge them.

Clam Digging:

Public access to the bay clam digging areas of Tillamook Bay is limited to the Garibaldi tidal flat or the large tidal flat adjacent on the Bay Ocean Peninsula just south of Crab Harbor. The clam digging at the tidal flat located just south of the Crab Harbor is great for gaper clams and cockles. Access the Garibaldi tidal flat via 12th street. Butter clams, gaper clams as well as some cockles are located in the tidal flats dominated by gravel substrate west of the 12 street crabbing dock. Digging in the mixed substrate of gravel, mud and sand using a potato fork with a shovel is difficult at best. We recommend digging for bay clams from the tidal flats accessible by boats of from the tidal flats from the Bay Ocean Peninsula Rd, but it is a long walk that requires the use of some type of cart to carry your equipment. Use caution when walking out onto the tidal flats. Becoming trapped in the mud is easy and getting unstuck can be nearly impossible.

Thanks to anonymous for sharing the success with friends digging gaper clams and crabbing in Tillamook Bay.

Internet Links of Interest for Tillamook Bay:

Click on the Oregon Coast Today Newspaper to see interesting places to visit and new things to experience while visiting the Central Oregon Coast.

Click on the Coast Guard Jettycam real time views of the bar crossing of Oregon's Bays and follow the instructions.

Tidal Projections: for Tillamook Bay. Click on the NOAA tidal projections for Oregon. Enter Tillamook Bay in the search parameter box and click on your tidal area of interest.

Plan for future clamdigging and or crabbing adventures by clicking on the tidal projections for Tillamook Bay at the Barview Jetty.

Click on the Weather Forecast to view the 10 day local weather forecast for the Port of Garibaldi at Tillamook Bay.

Click on the following link to view the 7 day weather forecast for the Bay Ocean Peninsula County Park.

Click on the following link to view the detailed 4 day Marine Weather Forecast.

Click on the Marine Weather Forecast Zone Forecast to view Coastal waters from Cape Shoalwater WA to Cascade Head OR out 10 nm.

Recommended website: Click on the following link to see an detailed hourly forecast for weather and surf conditions on the norhern Oregon Coast. Then click your coastal zone of interest to view the detail information compiled on the Marine Digital Point Forecast Matrix Interface.

Northwest River Forecast Center:Scroll over the water level gauge station. Click the river gauge station icon to display the river gauge station information

Click on the following link to view the river level of the Trask River above Cedar Creek near Tillamook.

Click on the following link to view the river level of the Wilson River at the Sollie Smith Bridge.

Recreational Advisories:

Always call the Oregon Shellfish Hotline at (503) 986-4728 or 1-800-448-2474 toll free outside of Oregon before harvesting clams or mussels for messages listing the areas closed to harvesting shellfish due to high levels of marine toxins.

Fish and Shellfish Consumption Advisories and Guidelines In mid July the State issued shellfish advisories for elevated levels of arsenic in soft shell clams and gaper clams. The CDAO does not recommend consuming contaminated clams or fish species of any species. The Oregon Health Authority has prepared a series of asked and answered questions about the soft shell clams taken from Oregon's Bays. Click on Questions and Answers (pdf).

However the purple varnish clams common to most of Oregon's Bays have tested free of contamination from arsenic; and to date the clams have not been contaminated by Domoic Acid or PSP that have closed the Oregon Coast to the taking of razor clams and mussels.

Oregon's Beach Monitoring Program is a part time program that occurs between Memorial Day in May and Labor Day in September.

Oregon's Beach Monitoring program helps protect people who come into contact with beach water contaminated with elevated levels of fecal bacterium called enterococcus. The program does regular water testing to look for high levels of bacteria and issues a public health advisory when bacteria counts exceed acceptable risk levels.. Beginning in 2017 the EPA has implemented new higher standards to requiring Oregon to issue an alert notifying the public of the health risks.

New Beach Action Value for the 2017 beach monitoring season
The Oregon Beach Monitoring Program (OBMP) is beginning a process to adopt a new beach action value (BAV) for bacteria of 70 MPN that will be used as the basis for public health advisories at Oregon beaches starting in 2017. The 2015 and 2016 monitoring seasons will remain unchanged and continue to use the current BAV of 158 MPN
.

What type of bacteria? Ocean waters are tested to see if a fecal bacterium called enterococcus is present. Enterococcus is found in the intestines of warm blooded animals, including humans. High levels of these bacteria show there is fecal material in the water and that microscopic disease-causing organisms may be present.

How does the water become contaminated? Fecal contamination can be due to multiple causes near anybody of water. Some of the reasons of contamination are due to: animal feces deposited by domestic animals and all wild animals including beavers, seals, migratory waterfowl and seabirds , swimmers with diarrhea, children not properly cleaned after using the bathroom, the improper disposition of diapers, the vomiting or fecal matter in the water, agricultural and storm water run-off, sewage treatment plant spills, inadequate or the absence of public septic systems, failing or leaking of both public and private septic systems or the improper disposal of boat waste. The list of offending agents is seemingly endless. Do your part it reduce contamination of our waterways.

The Algae Bloom Surveillance program advises the public when a harmful algae bloom has been detected in a lake or river. Not all blooms are harmful, but some species of algae, such as cyanobacteria or blue-green algae, can produce toxins that can cause serious illness in pets, livestock, wildlife and humans.

Please see the Oregon fish consumption guidelines for more information abut the health benefits of fish and how to make healthy fish choices.

Mile by mile continuation

55.9 the Mill smokestack towers 195 feet above the Old Mill site.

56.9 Miami River.

61.0 The Kelchis Point Reserve is approximately 200 acres along Tillamook Bay in Bay City, Oregon. The Tillamook County Pioneer Museum (TCPM) owns, protects, maintains, and holds this land in the public trust. Kilchis Point is home to a wide variety of plants (flora) and animals (fauna) that together form precious ecosystems.

63.0 Kilchis River

63.9 Tillamook is world famous for cheddar cheese. The Tillamook Cheese Factory offers a self–guided tour. View the cheese making process through the viewing windows.

64.1 Wilson River

64.4 The Latimer Quilt and Textile Center is a museum and living arts center. It is housed in the restored 1930s Maple Leaf schoolhouse and features exhibits of vintage and contemporary textiles. It also is an active place for the creation of textile arts, complete with classrooms and a resource library. It is located at 2105 Wilson River Loop Road a short distance from U.S. Highway 101.

65.0 The Tillamook County Pioneer Museum has a huge collection of information on the area, its history and its people. The three-story museum is a piece of local history, too. It was built in 1905 and served as the county courthouse for 30 years. Among its most popular attractions are a replica of a blacksmith shop and a forest fire lookout station. The research library has many shelves full of historical information, with more than 3,000 volumes. The museum is located in the heart of downtown Tillamook at 2106 2nd Street.

Tillamook is the gateway to the Three Capes Scenic Loop. Visitors to the Three Capes Scenic Loop have the opportunity to enjoy the unsurpassed visual grandeur of Oregon’s coastal treasures. The view of Tillamook Bay from Cape Mears provides the visitor with a vision of things to come as they travel south on the Three Capes Scenic Loop

65.1 Coast Route directions for visitors traveling south on Three Capes Scenic Loop. Highway 101 goes inland through the communities of Beaver, Hebo and Cloverdale before rejoining the Coast Route at Nestucca Bay but the Sand Lake cutoff bypasses Cape Mears and Cape Lookout at mile marker 76.7 on Highway101. Hwy 6 parallels the Wilson River as it winds east through the Tillamook Forest of the Coast Range before Hwy 6 joins the Sunset Hwy west of Portland.

Trask River

Loren’s Pond  is stocked with catchable rainbow trout. The small pond is  Located 3/10 mile below Trask Hatchery. From Long Prairie Rd. Turn east on Chance Rd towards Trask Hatchery. Turn left onto gravel road approximately 2.2 miles from intersection look for a small white triangular angler access sign. Follow gravel road past a barn and farm house, at this point the road curves to the left proceed approximately 200 yards the pond is in an old gravel pit on the left at the wide turnout. 

Tahoe Lake is a 2 acre lake located in the upper Trask River watershed. The lake is stocked with rainbow trout. Drive the north side of the Trask River beyond where the pavement ends and watch for signs.

68.0 Tillamook River runs beneath HWY 101.

68.1 Tillamook is also the location of the Tillamook Air Museum with its collection of World War Two aircraft, but the planes are gone except for as they appear in our video clip. The Tillamook Air Museum. The video provides the visitor with a glimpse of horror and glory of War. The Tillamook Air Museum: is no more. The planes have gone. The video provides the visitor with a glimpse of horror and glory of War.

The current aircraft on display include: the Aerospacelines Mini-Guppy, Bell TH-57 Hellicopter, Cessna 180F Skywagon, Chris-Teena Mini-Coupe, Douglas A4-B Skyhawk (on Highway 101), Erco Ercoupe 415-C, Fairchild Gk-1, Grumman F-14A Tomcat, Kaman HTK-1 (Helicopter), Ling-Temco-Vought A-7 Corsair ll, Mikoyan-Gurevich Mig-17/Lim 6, Nieuport 11 (Replica), Nord 1101 Noralpha, Quickie (homebuilt aircraft hanging above Café), 1967 Parker 2nd Ranger Glider, Learjet 24, Mikoyan-Gurevich Mig-17F/Lim5, A-26C Invader, Fouga-CM 170 Magister, BAC Jet Provost Mk. 3A, 1939 Piper J3 Cub and the C-27A Spartan.

73.2 Munson Falls, click on Munson Falls: to enjoy the spectacular view.

80.5 Beaver is the access point for the upper reach of the Nestucca River and the Nestucca River Back Country Byway. The Nestucca River National Back Country Byway traverses the Oregon Coast Range following one of Oregon’s most scenic rivers. It offers the traveler a leisurely route through a typical coastal forest and its varied attractions. Multiple land use of the area is well demonstrated in forest, recreation, fisheries, and wildlife management from Beaver to Carlton.

Battle Lake Access to this trail is from Beaver, OR.  Turn east on Blaine Road.   Travel for 3.6 miles, turn left (north) onto Borba Rd and travel 4.0 miles to trailhead. This 0.6 mile trail ends at the remote 2.3 acre lake. The lake is periodically stocked with fingerling rainbow trout.

84.9 Hebo is the junction of Hwy 22 and Hwy 101 between Hebo and Salem. Hwy 22 is the access point to the Hebo Ranger Station located on Hwy 22 just beyond the intersection of Mount Hebo Road and Hwy 22.

Hebo Lake is located 4 ½ miles east of Hebo on the Hebo Mountain Road. From Hebo take Hwy 22 ¼ mile east and turn left onto Forest Road 14. The lake is heavily stocked with rainbow trout. The lake is located .2 tenths of a mile from the parking area at the campground. Amenities at the campground include picnic tables, ADA barrier-free fishing platforms, restrooms, and several hiking trails. 

South Lake is a 5-acre lake located within the Siuslaw National Forest. This lake is located on the ridgeline above Hebo Lake. Next to the lake is a U.S. Forest Service campground that is open year around. The last several miles of road to the lake are unimproved and rough. Use caution on this road. It is not advisable to take trailers to this lake. The lake contains catchable rainbow trout.

87.5 is the location of the Dariy Community of Cloverdale. just north of the road to Community of Woods just north of Pacific City and intersection of Hwy 101 and Brooten Rd. at mile marker 90.4.

Directions for The Three Capes Senic Loop from Tillamook to intersection of Highway 101 and Brooten Road.

The Three Capes Scenic Loop south begins by turning west onto 3rd Street in the City of Tillamook. The Coast Route continues south on the Netarts Highway to the Three Capes Scenic Loop via Bayocean Road (1.8 miles from Hwy 101 at Tillamook) to the Bayocean Peninsula and the community of Cape Mears. The Three Capes Scenic Loop continues by turning left on the Cape Mears Road (7.2 miles from Hwy 101 at Tillamook) to the communities of Oceanside (11.8 miles from Hwy 101 at Tillamook) and Netarts Bay (14.5 miles from Hwy 101 a Tillamook). From Netarts travel along the bay on Netarts Bay Drive, this becomes Whiskey Creek Road to Cape Lookout State Park. Whiskey Creek Road becomes Cape Lookout Road before the entrance to Cape Lookout State Park (22.5 miles from Hwy 101 at Tillamook). Drive over Cape Lookout to the Sand Lake Road. Turn right onto Sand Lake Road to Sand Lake (29.5 miles from Hwy 101 at Tillamook) and Cape Kiwanda (34.1 miles from Hwy 101 at Tillamook). At Pacific City turn left and cross the Nestucca River (35.0 miles from Hwy 101 at Tillamook). Turn right onto Brooten Road. Brooten Road follows the north shore of Nestucca Bay where it rejoins Highway 101 at mile marker 90.4.

The Brad Dawson tidewater handicap access facility located on Hwy 131 (Netarts Hwy) 1/8 mile south of the intersection of Bay Ocean Rd is an example of just how recreational friendly Tillamook Bay is. It is handicapped accessible and is located on the Netarts Highway at the confluence of the Tillamook River and South Fork of the Trask River and provides the disabled the opportunity to fish for salmon and sturgeon. Continue south 6.6 miles to Netarts Bay and the community of Netarts.

Bayocean Peninsula The community of Bay Ocean on the Bay Ocean Peninsula was reclaimed by the ocean beginning in 1954 when the sand spit was breached and the ocean washed tons of sediment into Tillamook Bay. Today the Bay Ocean Peninsula is a Nature Trail that ends at the South Jetty of the entrance to Tillamook Bay. Bay clams are dug from the bay side of the sand spit and some razor clams are dug from the ocean side of the sand spit.

Tillamook Bay JettyThe south jetty is accessed via Bayocean Peninsula Road.  Drive to the end of the road, park and walk out to the jetty.  It is about a mile walk to the South Jetty.  The best salmon fishing is from the south jetty because the salmon accumulate in the ocean behind the South Jetty prior to entering the bay.  Fish from either the ocean side or the bayside of the jetty for salmon and rockfish.  The fishing for all perch species is excellent from the South Jetty or from ocean side of the Bayocean Peninsula.  The Bar View Jetty is the north jetty of Tillamook Bay.  

Cape Meares Lake (From Atlas of Oregon Lakes, Johnson et al. 1985).  Cape Meares Lake (also known as Bayocean Lake) has a very unusual history. In 1952 Bayocean Spit, separating Tillamook Bay from the Pacific Ocean, was breached by storm waves through Biggs Cove at its southern end. This event was the final blow in the decline of Bayocean Park, an ill—fated resort community that had been established on the spit early in the century. Apparently, the supply of beach sand to the spit had been reduced over the years because of the construction of North Jetty at the mouth of Tillamook Bay. In an attempt to rebuild the spit, the Army Corps of Engineers in the 1950s constructed a long rock—and sand—filled dike along its east side. The Pacific shoreline was quickly reestablished, although sand has not yet filled in as far as the dike. That portion of open water remaining behind the dike is Cape Meares Lake, a shallow body of fresh water which will gradually shrink in size and disappear as sand dunes encroach from the west and sediments accumulate from the drainage basin. 

At the south end of Bayocean Spit are extensive vernal pools and marshes which grade into the rich aquatic vegetation of the 120 acre lake. The only surface inflow is through this bog area; outflow to Tillamook Bay is controlled through the dike. Waterfowl and marsh birds use the wetland habitat for breeding and feeding, while bass and rainbow trout are found in the lake. The Oregon Department of Fish and Wildlife has used the lake for fish—rearing, and the Nature Conservancy has expressed interest in the whole region because of the diversity of vegetation and habitat. The drainage basin to the south and the shoreline are primarily county land, thus assuring public access. Small boats can be carried onto the lake for recreation. 

Due to its exposure to strong Pacific winds and its very shallow depth Cape Meares Lake does not develop any pronounced temperature stratification. The swampy drainage basin contributes dissolved organic matter which imparts a brown tint to the water. Macrophytes cover much of this eutrophic lake and are the principal source of primary productivity. The conductivity and sodium/chloride concentrations are very high, second only to Eckman Lake among the coastal lakes included in this survey. High salinity is due to proximity to the ocean which supplies sea spray to the lake and its small drainage basin. Stocked rainbow trout are the main attraction but the lake also contains largemouth bass, sunfish and bullhead catfish.

Cape Mears Beach and the Community of Cape Mears are located north of Cape Mears and south of the Bayocean Peninsula 7.9 miles at the end of Bayocean Road. Parking is limited within the Community of Cape Mears. There is fair to excellent fishing for redtail surfperch along the ocean side of the beach from late spring through summer.

28.6 north 9.3 south – Cape Mears State Scenic Viewpoint is located north of Oceanside Beach on Cape Mears. The emphasis is on the outstanding view and the tormented Octopus tree. The light at Cape Mears lighthouse was lit on January 1, 1890. The Coast Trail continues to Short Beach on the south side of the park.

27.2 north 10.7 south –Short Beach is accessed through the south end of Cape Mears State Park or Park along the highway 1.1 miles north of Oceanside and follow the trail down to the beach. Fishing for redtail surfperch from late spring through summer is good.

26.1 north 11. 8 south – Oceanside Beach is located 2.0 miles north of Netarts Bay off of the Cape Mears Road. The beach has been listed by ODFW as a location to dig for razor clams and is a good location to fish for redtail surfperch. The Ocean Beach State Wayside has a small but ample parking area. Mt. Maxwell located above Oceanside is a favorite location of Oregon’s hang gliders.

23.4 north 14.5 south Netarts Bay is one of the pearls of the Three Capes Scenic Loop. The bay, Oregon’s sixth largest, is more like a tidal basin than a bay because it receives a limited amount of freshwater from the small streams flowing into it. The absence of a large river flowing into it, plus the isolation of the bay, has spared it from the effects of human development that have degraded the water quality of Oregon’s other large bays. Oysters grown in the bay are renowned for their quality and flavor because of the high quality of the water. The freshwater entering the bay has minimal effect on the salinity of the saltwater in the bay and for this reason the bay is noted more for the excellent crabbing and clam digging than for fishing.

Navigational information for crossing the bar at Netarts Bay. It is dangerous to attempt to cross the bar at Netarts Bay at anytime. Use caution when boating in the lower bay. Plan your boating activities to clear of the lower bay prior to low tide. The high velocity of the outgoing tide can pull a small boat across the bar into the surf.

Redtail surfperch, pileperch, walleye surfperch, silver surfperch, striped seaperch and white seaperch enter the bay for most of the year to feed.  Fishing ranges from good to excellent from spring through fall and from poor to fair in winter.  Fishing is excellent at the Boiler Hole just south of the boat launch in the lower half of the bay and in the channels adjacent to the tidal flats.

Kelp greenling, whitespotted greenling and rock greenling enter the bay with the tide.  The best fishing occurs during the fall and in the spring in the lower bay.  Sea trout and perch are often caught in the same areas.

Black rockfish and copper rockfish are caught in Netarts Bay but the fishing is inconsistent.     

Starry Flounder fishing ranges from poor for most of the year to fair in early spring.

ODFW Crab and Clam Distribution Maps for Netarts Bay

Click on the image of the map to enlarge it. Click on the Seacor Shellfish Areas for Netarts Bay to link to ODFW's maps of the shellfish

Netarts Bay Crabbing: What has changed Winter crabbing productivity? At one time in the recent past crabbing in Netarts Bay was excellent for most of the year especially during winter. The winter crabbing in Netarts Bay was the most productive of any bay on the Oregon Coast. Today, the productive crabbing during the winter months has declined to mediocre. The consensus of opinion offered by local's boils down to two reasons: 1. the increased Dungeness crab catch by commercial crabbers crabbing in the ocean outside of the bar and shoaling occurring at the entrance at the bay at the bar. My guess it is a combination of factors.

Kelp crabs: last summer crabbers Tim and Walt report crabbing from the shore at Happy Camp for Dungeness crabs is slow. However Tim caught 8 kelp crabs. All of which he returned to the bay. Kelp crabs are not fit to eat.

Last summer found one lucky crabber catching a starry flounder from the shore at Happy Camp.

Clam Digging Netarts Bay:

Large gaper clams can be located at a depth up to 39 inches under sandy substrate making nearly impossible to dig without a cylinder to keep the sand from caving in filling the hole. The gaper clam in the video was not as deep as hoped for but what difference does it make.

On August 11 After visiting the tidal flats on the west side of Netarts Bay and failing to find any clams where we usually dig them, we located a large tidal flat of amazing abundance of bay clams further up the bay. What was so amazing was the area showed no signs of anyone having dug clams from the area. We were going to dig our usual mixture of bay clams but could resist taking limits of fist sized cockles showing at our feet.

on 06/09 the trip from Netarts Bay offered a great view of the Elk grazing at the property of the Tillamook Air Museum. I was so excited at seeing the elk on my way home from digging clams at Netarts, I had to stop and film them after taking Josh Kline clam digging at Netarts. Josh Kling and friends went clam digging at Netarts Bay for gaper and butter clams. The group camped at Cape Lookout State Park over the weekend. I had a dreat time heling those folks that were new to digging clams.

On 06/29 my buddy Walt and I walked in at the Whiskey Creek fish hatchery looking for Steamer Clams. We found the digging few and far between. The size and abundance of all species of bay clams continues to decline. We both took home limits of Manila Clams but we picked up most of the clams from surface of the substrate.

Thin Shell Littleneck Clams are an uncommon clam found in Netarts Bay. Netarts is the bay to dig for Thin Shell Littleneck clams. I plan on digging them. Bill

On 05/18/14 My wife and I visited Netarts Bay to butter clams and Manila clams. It was her first clam dig. We had a great time.

On 08/01/12 My friends returned to Netarts Bay to search for large softshell clams but without success I managed to dig but one softshell clam; however, diggging for gaper clams, butter clams and Manila clams was productive as shown below.

On 07/21/12 I was not satisfied with the Manila clams I dug on 07/17 and returned to Netarts Bay to dig for larger Manila clams. My effort was rewarded when my clam dog and I tried another spot further up the bay. The 5 inch softshell clam was a surprise and I intend on returning tomorrow to see if the old man has enough juice to dig a limit of softshell clams and a limit of bay clams as shown below.

On 07/17/12 My wife, Diane and I drove to Whiskey Creek to dig for Manila Clams, but it was raining when we arrived and Diane waited in the SUV while I dug clams. I met a young lady who had raked a limit of Manila clams leaving the Fish Hatchery and asked her for a heads up on where to go. She told me to go past the stick sticking out of the mud and go north to dig clams. I followed her advice and dug a limit of Manila clams. It was not until I set down at home and viewed the video of my clam digging adventure that I realized the meaning of the series of the sticks in the mud extending across the tidal flats. Are boundary markers for the Shellfish Reserve? While I was out digging clams my wife informed me that an OSP officer drove into the parking area and disappeared into the tree. The importance of the sticks in the mud and the OSP officer walking into the trees became apparent. Was he looking for diggers digging in the Shellfish Reserve? I looked in the 2012 Oregon Sport Fishing Regulations and could not find any reference to boundary location markers. I had a great time digging Manila clams at Whiskey Creek. You will enjoy raking for Manila clams there.

On 06/04/12 I went clam digging for razor clams on Cape Lookout Spit. I dug 1 razor clams out of the 3 shows in the wet sand. One of the other 5 diggers had 2 razor clams. I noticed a number of molted female crab shells on the beach, which means the males are still being occupied by the females outside of the bay. Crabbing in the bay is still slow but has picked up somewhat.

My buddy Rick and his daughter dug limits of mostly butter clams from the tidal flats in Netarts Bay. We took his boat and looked for clams on the isolated tidal flats near the mouth of the bay. Rick dug one 5 1/2 inch razor clam. It was the only one we found. However, we did find a small pocket of large gaper clams, that we will dig the next time out.

On 06/02/12 and 06/03 Clam Clinic Netarts bay was attended by 42 participants dug limits of bay clams.

On 08/29/11 my buddy Bill (RIP) asked to dig some steamer clams, so off to Netarts Bay we went.

You have to work to dig limits of steamer clams at Netarts Bay and today was no different. What a great day it turned out to be. With a little instruction, Bill dug his second limit of steamer clams. His first limit was taken from the Hood Canal years ago.

My wife wanted some chowder so I dug butter clams to make a small batch of tasty creamy style chowder, but I took the time to dig 6 steamer clams for taste treat for myself.

Netarts Bay and Coos Bay are the two Oregon's Bays that have a verified population of geoduck clams but the clams are seldom found in the intertidal zone. Clam digger Jim knew what he was looking at when he saw the neck of the geoduck.

Internet Links of interest for Netarts Bay:

View the NOAA Tidal Projections and click on your area of interest.

View future tidal projections for Netarts Bay 2014.

Click on the following link to view the Marine Weather Forecast from Zone Forecast: Coastal waters from Cape Shoalwater WA to Cascade Head OR out 10 nm.

18.1 north 19.8 southCape Lookout State Park is another gem on the Three Capes Scenic Loop and is locatedin one of the most beautiful coastal settings in Oregon. Cape Lookout State Park is a full service park and is located on the south end of Netarts Bay off of the Cape Lookout Road.

A popular campground and day-use area, Cape Lookout is located on a sand spit between Netarts Bay and the ocean, giving you a terrific view of the ocean with easy access to the beach. Beachcombing is popular here, and the park is reputedly a good place to find glass floats. More than eight miles of hiking and walking trails wind through a lush old-growth forest. The Cape Lookout trail follows the headland for more than two miles. A bench is located at the end of the trail. Enjoy the view! You might see a whale or two along with other wildlife.

One walking trail -- the nature trail -- is perfect for a shorter jaunt. The nature trail gives you a close-up view of native trees and other plants. Numbered markers are keyed to a trail guide. The beach which runs for more than three miles from the base of Cape Lookout to the end of the Netarts sand spit provides another great option for walking at Cape Lookout. Be sure to be aware of incoming tides, as some areas of the beach will completely disappear during high tide.

Be sure to look up when you visit this park ... hang gliders and paragliders fill the air with colorful wings as they catch thermals and rise to dizzying heights. Along with Cape Kiwanda and Cape Meares, Lookout is part of the Three Capes Scenic Route.

The Netarts Bay sand spit is accessd through Cape Lookout State Park. Razor clams are dug on the ocean side to the tip of the spit. Fishing for redtail surfperch is excellent on the ocean side of the spit. Access to the spit is through the State Park or by boat across Netarts Bay.

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